Slipped capital femoral epiphysis associated with radiation therapy

Randall T. Loder, Robert N. Hensinger, Philip D. Alburger, David D. Aronsson, James H. Beaty, Dennis R. Roy, Robert P. Stanton, Ron Turker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

We reviewed 32 children with 41 radiation-therapy associated slipped capital femoral epiphyses (RTAS-CFE). Ten were from the authors' institutions and 22 from the literature. Gender distribution was equal. The age at diagnosis of the malignancy was 4.3 ± 3.1 years; the amount of radiation was 4,240 ± 1,445 rads. Children with RTASCFE presented younger (10.4 ± 3.2 years) than a routine SCFE. The average symptom duration was 5 ± 6 months. Children with RTASCFE are usually thin (median weight, 10th percentile) in contrast to children with typical SCFE, who are usually obese (<95th percentile). The majority (82%) of the slips were mild, compared to routine SCFEs (~50%); 28% were bilateral. There was a positive linear relationship between the age at presentation of the SCFE and the age at diagnosis of the malignancy; there was a negative linear relationship between the age at presentation of the SCFE and the amount of radiation therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)630-636
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Orthopaedics
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 12 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Malignancy
  • Radiation therapy
  • Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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  • Cite this

    Loder, R. T., Hensinger, R. N., Alburger, P. D., Aronsson, D. D., Beaty, J. H., Roy, D. R., Stanton, R. P., & Turker, R. (1998). Slipped capital femoral epiphysis associated with radiation therapy. Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, 18(5), 630-636. https://doi.org/10.1097/00004694-199809000-00015