Small intestinal submucosa as a small-diameter arterial graft in the dog

Gary C. Lantz, Stephen F. Badylak, Arthur C. Coffey, Leslie A. Geddes, William E. Blevins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

166 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autogenous saphenous vein, human umbilical vein, modified bovine collagen, Dacron, and PTFE have been used as small-diameter arterial grafts with moderate success. We tested autogenous small intestine submucosa as a small-diameter arterial graft in both a carotid and femoral artery (mean ID 4.3 mm) of 18 dogs (total of 36 grafts). All dogs received aspirin and warfarin sodium for the first 8 weeks after surgery. Graft patency was evaluated by Doppler ultrasound techniques and angiography. Two grafts ruptured and 5 grafts occluded by 21 days after surgery. One graft became occluded at 14 weeks. Fifteen dogs were sacrificed at periodic intervals until 48 weeks after surgery. Patent grafts had no evidence of infection, propagating thrombus, or intimal hyperplasia. Graft aneurysmal dilation occurred in 4 grafts (11% The grafts were composed of a dense organized collagenous connective tissue with no evidence of endothelial cell growth on the smooth luminal surface. Three dogs are alive at 76 to 82 weeks after surgery. Overall, graft patency was 75% Graft patency after cessation of anticoagulation therapy was 92.3% (12 of 13 grafts). We conclude that autogenous small intestinal submucosa can be used as a small-diameter arterial graft in the dog and is worthy of further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-227
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Investigative Surgery
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dogs
Transplants
Tunica Intima
Doppler Ultrasonography
Umbilical Veins
Polyethylene Terephthalates
Saphenous Vein
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Warfarin
Femoral Artery
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Carotid Arteries
Connective Tissue
Aspirin
Small Intestine
Hyperplasia
Dilatation
Angiography
Thrombosis
Collagen

Keywords

  • Arterial graft
  • Autogenous
  • Dog
  • Intestine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Lantz, G. C., Badylak, S. F., Coffey, A. C., Geddes, L. A., & Blevins, W. E. (1990). Small intestinal submucosa as a small-diameter arterial graft in the dog. Journal of Investigative Surgery, 3(3), 217-227. https://doi.org/10.3109/08941939009140351

Small intestinal submucosa as a small-diameter arterial graft in the dog. / Lantz, Gary C.; Badylak, Stephen F.; Coffey, Arthur C.; Geddes, Leslie A.; Blevins, William E.

In: Journal of Investigative Surgery, Vol. 3, No. 3, 1990, p. 217-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lantz, GC, Badylak, SF, Coffey, AC, Geddes, LA & Blevins, WE 1990, 'Small intestinal submucosa as a small-diameter arterial graft in the dog', Journal of Investigative Surgery, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 217-227. https://doi.org/10.3109/08941939009140351
Lantz, Gary C. ; Badylak, Stephen F. ; Coffey, Arthur C. ; Geddes, Leslie A. ; Blevins, William E. / Small intestinal submucosa as a small-diameter arterial graft in the dog. In: Journal of Investigative Surgery. 1990 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 217-227.
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