Smoking and risk of skin cancer

A prospective analysis and a meta-analysis

Fengju Song, Abrar A. Qureshi, Xiang Gao, Tricia Li, Jiali Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The association between smoking and the risk of skin cancer has not been well established. Methods: In two large cohorts in the USA, we prospectively examined the risks of melanoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) among participants grouped according to smoking variables. Results: Among men, compared with never smokers, ever smokers had a significantly lower risk of melanoma [relative risk (RR) = 0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.58-0.86]; those who smoked for 30 years had an RR of 0.65 (95% CI: 0.48-0.89) (Ptrend = 0.003); those who smoked 15 cigarettes per day had an RR of 0.32 (95% CI: 0.13-0.78) (Ptrend = 0.006) and those who smoked for > 45 pack years had an RR of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.45-0.97) (Ptrend = 0.03). Ever smokers also had a slightly lower risk of BCC (RR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.90-0.98). There was no significant association for SCC (RR = 0.99; 95% CI: 0.89-1.12). In women, no significant association was found for melanoma (RR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.83-1.10). Compared with never smokers, ever smokers had a slightly higher risk of BCC (RR = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.03-1.08) and a higher risk of SCC (RR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.08-1.31). A significant inverse association between smoking and melanoma was limited to the head and neck (RR = 0.65; 95% CI: 0.42-0.89). Conclusions: Smoking was inversely associated with melanoma risk, especially on the head and neck. Further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanism(s).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberdys146
Pages (from-to)1694-1705
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Skin Neoplasms
Meta-Analysis
Smoking
Confidence Intervals
Melanoma
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Neck
Head
Tobacco Products

Keywords

  • Cohort study
  • Meta-analysis
  • Skin cancer
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Smoking and risk of skin cancer : A prospective analysis and a meta-analysis. / Song, Fengju; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Gao, Xiang; Li, Tricia; Han, Jiali.

In: International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 41, No. 6, dys146, 01.12.2012, p. 1694-1705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Song, Fengju ; Qureshi, Abrar A. ; Gao, Xiang ; Li, Tricia ; Han, Jiali. / Smoking and risk of skin cancer : A prospective analysis and a meta-analysis. In: International Journal of Epidemiology. 2012 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 1694-1705.
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abstract = "Background: The association between smoking and the risk of skin cancer has not been well established. Methods: In two large cohorts in the USA, we prospectively examined the risks of melanoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) among participants grouped according to smoking variables. Results: Among men, compared with never smokers, ever smokers had a significantly lower risk of melanoma [relative risk (RR) = 0.72; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): 0.58-0.86]; those who smoked for 30 years had an RR of 0.65 (95{\%} CI: 0.48-0.89) (Ptrend = 0.003); those who smoked 15 cigarettes per day had an RR of 0.32 (95{\%} CI: 0.13-0.78) (Ptrend = 0.006) and those who smoked for > 45 pack years had an RR of 0.66 (95{\%} CI: 0.45-0.97) (Ptrend = 0.03). Ever smokers also had a slightly lower risk of BCC (RR = 0.94; 95{\%} CI: 0.90-0.98). There was no significant association for SCC (RR = 0.99; 95{\%} CI: 0.89-1.12). In women, no significant association was found for melanoma (RR = 0.96; 95{\%} CI: 0.83-1.10). Compared with never smokers, ever smokers had a slightly higher risk of BCC (RR = 1.06; 95{\%} CI: 1.03-1.08) and a higher risk of SCC (RR = 1.19; 95{\%} CI: 1.08-1.31). A significant inverse association between smoking and melanoma was limited to the head and neck (RR = 0.65; 95{\%} CI: 0.42-0.89). Conclusions: Smoking was inversely associated with melanoma risk, especially on the head and neck. Further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanism(s).",
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T2 - A prospective analysis and a meta-analysis

AU - Song, Fengju

AU - Qureshi, Abrar A.

AU - Gao, Xiang

AU - Li, Tricia

AU - Han, Jiali

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AB - Background: The association between smoking and the risk of skin cancer has not been well established. Methods: In two large cohorts in the USA, we prospectively examined the risks of melanoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) among participants grouped according to smoking variables. Results: Among men, compared with never smokers, ever smokers had a significantly lower risk of melanoma [relative risk (RR) = 0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.58-0.86]; those who smoked for 30 years had an RR of 0.65 (95% CI: 0.48-0.89) (Ptrend = 0.003); those who smoked 15 cigarettes per day had an RR of 0.32 (95% CI: 0.13-0.78) (Ptrend = 0.006) and those who smoked for > 45 pack years had an RR of 0.66 (95% CI: 0.45-0.97) (Ptrend = 0.03). Ever smokers also had a slightly lower risk of BCC (RR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.90-0.98). There was no significant association for SCC (RR = 0.99; 95% CI: 0.89-1.12). In women, no significant association was found for melanoma (RR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.83-1.10). Compared with never smokers, ever smokers had a slightly higher risk of BCC (RR = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.03-1.08) and a higher risk of SCC (RR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.08-1.31). A significant inverse association between smoking and melanoma was limited to the head and neck (RR = 0.65; 95% CI: 0.42-0.89). Conclusions: Smoking was inversely associated with melanoma risk, especially on the head and neck. Further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanism(s).

KW - Cohort study

KW - Meta-analysis

KW - Skin cancer

KW - Smoking

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