Society of Behavioral Medicine supports implementation of high quality lung cancer screening in high-risk populations

Karriem S. Watson, Amanda C. Blok, Joanna Buscemi, Yamile Molina, Marian Fitzgibbon, Melissa A. Simon, Lance Williams, Kameron Matthews, Jamie L. Studts, Sarah E. Lillie, Jamie S. Ostroff, Lisa Carter-Harris, Robert A. Winn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) supports the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening of the chest for eligible populations to reduce lung cancer mortality. Consistent with efforts to translate research findings into real-world settings, SBM encourages health-care providers and health-care systems to (1) integrate evidence-based tobacco treatment as an essential component of LDCT-based lung cancer screening, (2) examine the structural barriers that may impact screening uptake, and (3) incorporate shared decision-making as a clinical platform to facilitate consultations and engagement with individuals at high risk for lung cancer about the potential benefits and harms associated with participation in a lung cancer screening program. We advise policy makers and legislators to support screening in high-risk populations by continuing to (1) expand access to high quality LDCT-based screening among underserved high-risk populations, (2) enhance cost-effectiveness by integrating evidence-based tobacco treatments into screening in high-risk populations, and (3) increase funding for research that explores implementation science and increased public awareness and access of diverse populations to participate in clinical and translational research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-671
Number of pages3
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Keywords

  • Lung cancer
  • Policy
  • Screening
  • Shared decision-making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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