Socioeconomic predictors of cognition in Ugandan children: Implications for community interventions

Paul Bangirana, Chandy John, Richard Idro, Robert O. Opoka, Justus Byarugaba, Anne M. Jurek, Michael J. Boivin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Several interventions to improve cognition in at risk children have been suggested. Identification of key variables predicting cognition is necessary to guide these interventions. This study was conducted to identify these variables in Ugandan children and guide such interventions. Methods: A cohort of 89 healthy children (45 females) aged 5 to 12 years old were followed over 24 months and had cognitive tests measuring visual spatial processing, memory, attention and spatial learning administered at baseline, 6 months and 24 months. Nutritional status, child's educational level, maternal education, socioeconomic status and quality of the home environment were also measured at baseline. A multivariate, longitudinal model was then used to identify predictors of cognition over the 24 months. Results: A higher child's education level was associated with better memory (p = 0.03), attention (p = 0.005) and spatial learning scores over the 24 months (p = 0.05); higher nutrition scores predicted better visual spatial processing (p = 0.002) and spatial learning scores (p = 0.008); and a higher home environment score predicted a better memory score (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Cognition in Ugandan children is predicted by child's education, nutritional status and the home environment. Community interventions to improve cognition may be effective if they target multiple socioeconomic variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere7898
JournalPLoS One
Volume4
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 19 2009
Externally publishedYes

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cognition
Cognition
socioeconomics
Education
Data storage equipment
Nutrition
Processing
learning
educational status
Nutritional Status
nutritional status
education
taxonomic keys
socioeconomic factors
socioeconomic status
Social Class
Mothers
nutrition
Spatial Learning
testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bangirana, P., John, C., Idro, R., Opoka, R. O., Byarugaba, J., Jurek, A. M., & Boivin, M. J. (2009). Socioeconomic predictors of cognition in Ugandan children: Implications for community interventions. PLoS One, 4(11), [e7898]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0007898

Socioeconomic predictors of cognition in Ugandan children : Implications for community interventions. / Bangirana, Paul; John, Chandy; Idro, Richard; Opoka, Robert O.; Byarugaba, Justus; Jurek, Anne M.; Boivin, Michael J.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 4, No. 11, e7898, 19.11.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bangirana, Paul ; John, Chandy ; Idro, Richard ; Opoka, Robert O. ; Byarugaba, Justus ; Jurek, Anne M. ; Boivin, Michael J. / Socioeconomic predictors of cognition in Ugandan children : Implications for community interventions. In: PLoS One. 2009 ; Vol. 4, No. 11.
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