Spinal cord infarction

L. S. Williams, A. Bruno, J. Biller

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spinal cord infarction (SCI) is uncommon and, therefore, not extensively studied. Little is known about the epidemiology and individual risk factors for SCI. The prognosis for functional recovery after SCI from any cause is not well documented. Despite these deficiencies, useful clinical information regarding SCI following surgical procedures is available. Many nonsurgical causes of SCI are also recognized, including aortic pathology, systemic hypoperfusion, atherosclerotic emboli, or other embolic materials. An understanding of the patterns of blood supply to the spinal cord and the more common causes of SCI will aid in guiding future trials of neuroprotective medications, growth factors, and various perioperative techniques aimed at decreasing functional disability following SCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-53
Number of pages13
JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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Infarction
Spinal Cord
Embolism
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Epidemiology
Pathology

Keywords

  • aortic diseases
  • ischemic myelopathy
  • spinal cord

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Spinal cord infarction. / Williams, L. S.; Bruno, A.; Biller, J.

In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 41-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Williams, L. S. ; Bruno, A. ; Biller, J. / Spinal cord infarction. In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation. 1996 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 41-53.
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