Stability of interferon-γ and interleukin-10 responses to Plasmodium falciparum liver stage antigen-1 and thrombospondin-related adhesive protein in residents of a malaria holoendemic area

Ann M. Moormann, Chandy C. John, Peter Odada Sumba, Daniel Tisch, Paula Embury, James W. Kazura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

The stability of anti-malarial immunity will influence the interpretation of immunologic endpoints during malaria vaccine trials conducted in endemic areas. Therefore, we evaluated cytokine responses to Plasmodium falciparum liver stage antigen-1 (LSA-1) and thrombospondin-related adhesive protein (TRAP) by Kenyans from a holoendemic area at a 9-month interval. The proportion of adults with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to 9-mer LSA-1 peptides was similar at both time-points, whereas responses from children decreased (P < 0.05). Response to the longer, 23-mer LSA-1 peptide was variable, decreasing in adults and children over time (P < 0.02 and P < 0.001, respectively). The proportion of children with IFN-γ responses to either antigen at the second time-point was significantly lower than that of adults, yet more adults responded to 9-mer TRAP peptides (P < 0.02). In contrast, the proportion of interleukin-10 responses to LSA-1 and TRAP was similar at both time-points for both age groups. Most noteworthy was that even when the repeat cross-sectional frequency of cytokine responses was the same, these responses were not generated by the same individuals. This suggests that cytokine responses to LSA-1 and TRAP are transient under natural exposure conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)585-590
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume74
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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