Staphylococcal adherence to polyvinyl chloride and heparin-bonded polyurethane catheters is species dependent and enhanced by fibronectin

P. B. Russell, J. Kline, Mervin Yoder, R. A. Polin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intravenous hyperalimentation has improved the survival of premature infants. However, long-term placement of intravenous catheters may result in the development of catheter-related sepsis. Fibronectin in plasma contains binding sites for staphylococcal species as well as marked affinity for inert plastics and therefore may provide a substrate for bacterial adherence to indwelling catheters. We determined the adherence of labeled ([3H]leucine) coagulase-positive (CPS) and coagulase-negative (CNS) staphylococci to untreated and fibronectin-coated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and heparin-bonded polyurethane (HBP) catheter segments and quantitated the binding of 14C-labeled, purified fibronectin to these catheters. PVC catheter segments bound significantly more CNS than CPS (P <0.05), while HBP catheters bound more CPS than CNS (P <0.05). Fibronectin significantly increased the adherence of CPS to PVC catheters (P <0.05) and CNS to HBP catheters (P <0.05). PVC catheters bound more fibronectin (P <0.0001) than did HBP catheters. Catheter composition may influence the spectrum of nosocomial pathogens to which infants are susceptible through different bacterial adherences and interactions with adhesive proteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1083-1087
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume25
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Polyurethanes
Fibronectins
Polyvinyl Chloride
Heparin
Catheters
Coagulase
Indwelling Catheters
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Staphylococcus
Premature Infants
Leucine
Adhesives
Plastics
Sepsis
Binding Sites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Staphylococcal adherence to polyvinyl chloride and heparin-bonded polyurethane catheters is species dependent and enhanced by fibronectin. / Russell, P. B.; Kline, J.; Yoder, Mervin; Polin, R. A.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 25, No. 6, 1987, p. 1083-1087.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Polin, R. A.

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