State Health Officials: Backgrounds and Qualifications

for the SHO-CASE Steering Committee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: State health officials (SHOs), the executive and administrative leaders of state public health, play a key role in policy development, must be versed in the relevant/current evidence, and provide expertise about health issues to the legislature and the governor. Objective: To provide an empirical examination of SHO backgrounds and qualifications over time. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional survey of current/former SHOs. Main Outcome Measures: State health official educational backgrounds; public health experience; previous employment setting. Results: Two-thirds of respondents (64.6%) reported having a medical degree, approximately half (48.3%) a formal public health degree, and almost one-quarter (21.8%) a management degree. The majority had governmental public health experience at some prior point in their career (70.0%). Almost two-thirds worked in governmental public health immediately before becoming an SHO. The proportion that was female increased significantly by decade from 5.6% in the 1970s/80s to 46.4% in the 2010s (P =.02). Conclusions: The main finding from this study shows that more than two-thirds of SHOs have had governmental public health experience at some point in their career. This is not a new trend as there were no statistical differences in public health experience by decade. More than half of the SHOs were appointed to the role directly from governmental public health, indicating that their public health experience is timely and likely germane to their appointment as SHO. Findings also indicate improvements in gender diversity among one of the most influential leadership roles in governmental public health whereas significant changes in racial and ethnic diversity were not identified. Women are increasingly being appointed as SHOs, indicating increasing gender diversity in this influential position. Given that governmental public health employees are predominantly women, there is still room for gender equity improvements in executive leadership roles. This is coupled with the need for further racial and ethnic diversity improvements as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Public Health Management and Practice
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Public Health
Health
Policy Making
Midazolam
Appointments and Schedules
Cross-Sectional Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • gender diversity
  • leadership
  • public health
  • public health workforce
  • state health official

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

State Health Officials : Backgrounds and Qualifications. / for the SHO-CASE Steering Committee.

In: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{68cf0e25be1c45e6b806b0a01f2d9225,
title = "State Health Officials: Backgrounds and Qualifications",
abstract = "Context: State health officials (SHOs), the executive and administrative leaders of state public health, play a key role in policy development, must be versed in the relevant/current evidence, and provide expertise about health issues to the legislature and the governor. Objective: To provide an empirical examination of SHO backgrounds and qualifications over time. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional survey of current/former SHOs. Main Outcome Measures: State health official educational backgrounds; public health experience; previous employment setting. Results: Two-thirds of respondents (64.6{\%}) reported having a medical degree, approximately half (48.3{\%}) a formal public health degree, and almost one-quarter (21.8{\%}) a management degree. The majority had governmental public health experience at some prior point in their career (70.0{\%}). Almost two-thirds worked in governmental public health immediately before becoming an SHO. The proportion that was female increased significantly by decade from 5.6{\%} in the 1970s/80s to 46.4{\%} in the 2010s (P =.02). Conclusions: The main finding from this study shows that more than two-thirds of SHOs have had governmental public health experience at some point in their career. This is not a new trend as there were no statistical differences in public health experience by decade. More than half of the SHOs were appointed to the role directly from governmental public health, indicating that their public health experience is timely and likely germane to their appointment as SHO. Findings also indicate improvements in gender diversity among one of the most influential leadership roles in governmental public health whereas significant changes in racial and ethnic diversity were not identified. Women are increasingly being appointed as SHOs, indicating increasing gender diversity in this influential position. Given that governmental public health employees are predominantly women, there is still room for gender equity improvements in executive leadership roles. This is coupled with the need for further racial and ethnic diversity improvements as well.",
keywords = "gender diversity, leadership, public health, public health workforce, state health official",
author = "{for the SHO-CASE Steering Committee} and Valerie Yeager and Nir Menachemi and Jacinto, {Corey M.} and Theresa Chapple-Mcgruder and Danielson, {Elizabeth C.} and Paul Halverson",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/PHH.0000000000000937",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Public Health Management and Practice",
issn = "1078-4659",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - State Health Officials

T2 - Backgrounds and Qualifications

AU - for the SHO-CASE Steering Committee

AU - Yeager, Valerie

AU - Menachemi, Nir

AU - Jacinto, Corey M.

AU - Chapple-Mcgruder, Theresa

AU - Danielson, Elizabeth C.

AU - Halverson, Paul

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Context: State health officials (SHOs), the executive and administrative leaders of state public health, play a key role in policy development, must be versed in the relevant/current evidence, and provide expertise about health issues to the legislature and the governor. Objective: To provide an empirical examination of SHO backgrounds and qualifications over time. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional survey of current/former SHOs. Main Outcome Measures: State health official educational backgrounds; public health experience; previous employment setting. Results: Two-thirds of respondents (64.6%) reported having a medical degree, approximately half (48.3%) a formal public health degree, and almost one-quarter (21.8%) a management degree. The majority had governmental public health experience at some prior point in their career (70.0%). Almost two-thirds worked in governmental public health immediately before becoming an SHO. The proportion that was female increased significantly by decade from 5.6% in the 1970s/80s to 46.4% in the 2010s (P =.02). Conclusions: The main finding from this study shows that more than two-thirds of SHOs have had governmental public health experience at some point in their career. This is not a new trend as there were no statistical differences in public health experience by decade. More than half of the SHOs were appointed to the role directly from governmental public health, indicating that their public health experience is timely and likely germane to their appointment as SHO. Findings also indicate improvements in gender diversity among one of the most influential leadership roles in governmental public health whereas significant changes in racial and ethnic diversity were not identified. Women are increasingly being appointed as SHOs, indicating increasing gender diversity in this influential position. Given that governmental public health employees are predominantly women, there is still room for gender equity improvements in executive leadership roles. This is coupled with the need for further racial and ethnic diversity improvements as well.

AB - Context: State health officials (SHOs), the executive and administrative leaders of state public health, play a key role in policy development, must be versed in the relevant/current evidence, and provide expertise about health issues to the legislature and the governor. Objective: To provide an empirical examination of SHO backgrounds and qualifications over time. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cross-sectional survey of current/former SHOs. Main Outcome Measures: State health official educational backgrounds; public health experience; previous employment setting. Results: Two-thirds of respondents (64.6%) reported having a medical degree, approximately half (48.3%) a formal public health degree, and almost one-quarter (21.8%) a management degree. The majority had governmental public health experience at some prior point in their career (70.0%). Almost two-thirds worked in governmental public health immediately before becoming an SHO. The proportion that was female increased significantly by decade from 5.6% in the 1970s/80s to 46.4% in the 2010s (P =.02). Conclusions: The main finding from this study shows that more than two-thirds of SHOs have had governmental public health experience at some point in their career. This is not a new trend as there were no statistical differences in public health experience by decade. More than half of the SHOs were appointed to the role directly from governmental public health, indicating that their public health experience is timely and likely germane to their appointment as SHO. Findings also indicate improvements in gender diversity among one of the most influential leadership roles in governmental public health whereas significant changes in racial and ethnic diversity were not identified. Women are increasingly being appointed as SHOs, indicating increasing gender diversity in this influential position. Given that governmental public health employees are predominantly women, there is still room for gender equity improvements in executive leadership roles. This is coupled with the need for further racial and ethnic diversity improvements as well.

KW - gender diversity

KW - leadership

KW - public health

KW - public health workforce

KW - state health official

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85069040868&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85069040868&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/PHH.0000000000000937

DO - 10.1097/PHH.0000000000000937

M3 - Article

C2 - 30807461

AN - SCOPUS:85069040868

JO - Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

JF - Journal of Public Health Management and Practice

SN - 1078-4659

ER -