State of the science

Hot flashes and cancer, Part 2: Management and future directions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose/Objectives: To critically evaluate and synthesize intervention research related to hot flashes in the context of cancer and to identify implications and future directions for policy, research, and practice. Data Sources: Published, peer-reviewed articles and textbooks; editorials; and computerized databases. Data Synthesis: Although a variety of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments are available, they may not be appropriate or effective for all individuals. Conclusions: The large and diverse evidence base and current national attention on hot flash treatment highlight the importance of the symptom to healthcare professionals, including oncology nurses. Implications for Nursing: Using existing research to understand, assess, and manage hot flashes in the context of cancer can prevent patient discomfort and improve the delivery of evidence-based care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)969-978
Number of pages10
JournalOncology Nursing Forum
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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Hot Flashes
Research
Neoplasms
Textbooks
Information Storage and Retrieval
Nursing
Nurses
Databases
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

State of the science : Hot flashes and cancer, Part 2: Management and future directions. / Carpenter, Janet.

In: Oncology Nursing Forum, Vol. 32, No. 5, 2005, p. 969-978.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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