Steady state visual evoked potential abnormalities in schizophrenia

Giri P. Krishnan, Jenifer Vohs, William P. Hetrick, Christine A. Carroll, Anantha Shekhar, Marcia A. Bockbrader, Brian O'Donnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The steady state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) can be used to test the frequency response function of neural circuits. Previous studies have shown reduced SSVEPs to alpha and lower frequencies of stimulation in schizophrenia. We investigated SSVEPs in schizophrenia at frequencies spanning the theta (4 Hz) to gamma (40 Hz) range. Methods: The SSVEPs to seven different frequencies of stimulation (4, 8, 17, 20, 23, 30 and 40 Hz) were obtained from 18 schizophrenia subjects and 33 healthy control subjects. Power at stimulating frequency (signal power) and power at frequencies above and below the stimulating frequency (noise power) were used to quantify the SSVEP responses. Results: Both groups showed an inverse relationship between power and frequency of stimulation. Schizophrenia subjects showed reduced signal power compared to healthy control subjects at higher frequencies (above 17 Hz), but not at 4 and 8 Hz at occipital region. Noise power was higher in schizophrenia subjects at frequencies between 4 and 20 Hz over occipital region and at 4, 17 and 20 Hz over frontal region. Conclusions: SSVEP signal power at beta and gamma frequencies of stimulation were reduced in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia subjects showed higher levels of EEG noise during photic stimulation at beta and lower frequencies. Significance: Inability to generate or maintain oscillations in neural networks may contribute to deficits in visual processing in schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)614-624
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume116
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

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Visual Evoked Potentials
Schizophrenia
Occipital Lobe
Healthy Volunteers
Photic Stimulation
Power (Psychology)
Noise
Electroencephalography

Keywords

  • Gamma activity
  • Oscillations
  • Schizophrenia
  • Steady state evoked potentials
  • VEP
  • Vision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Steady state visual evoked potential abnormalities in schizophrenia. / Krishnan, Giri P.; Vohs, Jenifer; Hetrick, William P.; Carroll, Christine A.; Shekhar, Anantha; Bockbrader, Marcia A.; O'Donnell, Brian.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 116, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 614-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krishnan, Giri P. ; Vohs, Jenifer ; Hetrick, William P. ; Carroll, Christine A. ; Shekhar, Anantha ; Bockbrader, Marcia A. ; O'Donnell, Brian. / Steady state visual evoked potential abnormalities in schizophrenia. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2005 ; Vol. 116, No. 3. pp. 614-624.
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