Stem and progenitor cells in the retina

Nilanjana Sengupta, Sergio Caballero, Nicanor Moldovan, Maria B. Grant

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Regardless of the debate regarding moral issues of using stem cells in research, they are unequivocally useful for understanding pathological angiogenesis, particularly so in the retina. Some important stem cell concepts include a niche, as well as the ideas of self-renewal and plasticity. Self-renewal is the maintenance of a stem cell population, through production of both undifferentiated and further differentiated cells (precursors), while plasticity is the differentiation of a stem cell into various cell types. However, questions regarding plasticity exist, since cell fusion was shown to be the underlying cause for some plasticity observations. Well-studied types of stem cells include neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells or progenitors such as endothelial precursor cells. Different cell surface markers help classify these cells types. Hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial precursor cells are involved in angiogenesis. Numerous hypoxia-regulated factors have been implicated in angiogenesis, including vascular endothelial growth factor, stromal derived factor-1, insulin-like growth factor, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Progenitor cells, found amongst both early (CD34+) or late (CD14+) blood mononuclear cells, are impaired in diabetes. Studying these types of cells, along with others, can dissect the precise molecular mechanisms underlying stem/progenitor cell activity in the retina.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationExperimental Approaches to Diabetic Retinopathy
PublisherS. Karger AG
Pages174-193
Number of pages20
Volume20
ISBN (Print)9783805592765, 9783805592758
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 24 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Retina
Stem Cells
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Endothelial Cells
Pathologic Neovascularization
Stem Cell Research
Neural Stem Cells
Cell Fusion
Chemokine CCL2
Somatomedins
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Blood Cells
Maintenance
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sengupta, N., Caballero, S., Moldovan, N., & Grant, M. B. (2009). Stem and progenitor cells in the retina. In Experimental Approaches to Diabetic Retinopathy (Vol. 20, pp. 174-193). S. Karger AG. https://doi.org/10.1159/000262669

Stem and progenitor cells in the retina. / Sengupta, Nilanjana; Caballero, Sergio; Moldovan, Nicanor; Grant, Maria B.

Experimental Approaches to Diabetic Retinopathy. Vol. 20 S. Karger AG, 2009. p. 174-193.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Sengupta, N, Caballero, S, Moldovan, N & Grant, MB 2009, Stem and progenitor cells in the retina. in Experimental Approaches to Diabetic Retinopathy. vol. 20, S. Karger AG, pp. 174-193. https://doi.org/10.1159/000262669
Sengupta N, Caballero S, Moldovan N, Grant MB. Stem and progenitor cells in the retina. In Experimental Approaches to Diabetic Retinopathy. Vol. 20. S. Karger AG. 2009. p. 174-193 https://doi.org/10.1159/000262669
Sengupta, Nilanjana ; Caballero, Sergio ; Moldovan, Nicanor ; Grant, Maria B. / Stem and progenitor cells in the retina. Experimental Approaches to Diabetic Retinopathy. Vol. 20 S. Karger AG, 2009. pp. 174-193
@inbook{2e864f04b2cd44f38fb5ee4c53b0b470,
title = "Stem and progenitor cells in the retina",
abstract = "Regardless of the debate regarding moral issues of using stem cells in research, they are unequivocally useful for understanding pathological angiogenesis, particularly so in the retina. Some important stem cell concepts include a niche, as well as the ideas of self-renewal and plasticity. Self-renewal is the maintenance of a stem cell population, through production of both undifferentiated and further differentiated cells (precursors), while plasticity is the differentiation of a stem cell into various cell types. However, questions regarding plasticity exist, since cell fusion was shown to be the underlying cause for some plasticity observations. Well-studied types of stem cells include neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells or progenitors such as endothelial precursor cells. Different cell surface markers help classify these cells types. Hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial precursor cells are involved in angiogenesis. Numerous hypoxia-regulated factors have been implicated in angiogenesis, including vascular endothelial growth factor, stromal derived factor-1, insulin-like growth factor, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Progenitor cells, found amongst both early (CD34+) or late (CD14+) blood mononuclear cells, are impaired in diabetes. Studying these types of cells, along with others, can dissect the precise molecular mechanisms underlying stem/progenitor cell activity in the retina.",
author = "Nilanjana Sengupta and Sergio Caballero and Nicanor Moldovan and Grant, {Maria B.}",
year = "2009",
month = "11",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1159/000262669",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9783805592765",
volume = "20",
pages = "174--193",
booktitle = "Experimental Approaches to Diabetic Retinopathy",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Stem and progenitor cells in the retina

AU - Sengupta, Nilanjana

AU - Caballero, Sergio

AU - Moldovan, Nicanor

AU - Grant, Maria B.

PY - 2009/11/24

Y1 - 2009/11/24

N2 - Regardless of the debate regarding moral issues of using stem cells in research, they are unequivocally useful for understanding pathological angiogenesis, particularly so in the retina. Some important stem cell concepts include a niche, as well as the ideas of self-renewal and plasticity. Self-renewal is the maintenance of a stem cell population, through production of both undifferentiated and further differentiated cells (precursors), while plasticity is the differentiation of a stem cell into various cell types. However, questions regarding plasticity exist, since cell fusion was shown to be the underlying cause for some plasticity observations. Well-studied types of stem cells include neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells or progenitors such as endothelial precursor cells. Different cell surface markers help classify these cells types. Hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial precursor cells are involved in angiogenesis. Numerous hypoxia-regulated factors have been implicated in angiogenesis, including vascular endothelial growth factor, stromal derived factor-1, insulin-like growth factor, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Progenitor cells, found amongst both early (CD34+) or late (CD14+) blood mononuclear cells, are impaired in diabetes. Studying these types of cells, along with others, can dissect the precise molecular mechanisms underlying stem/progenitor cell activity in the retina.

AB - Regardless of the debate regarding moral issues of using stem cells in research, they are unequivocally useful for understanding pathological angiogenesis, particularly so in the retina. Some important stem cell concepts include a niche, as well as the ideas of self-renewal and plasticity. Self-renewal is the maintenance of a stem cell population, through production of both undifferentiated and further differentiated cells (precursors), while plasticity is the differentiation of a stem cell into various cell types. However, questions regarding plasticity exist, since cell fusion was shown to be the underlying cause for some plasticity observations. Well-studied types of stem cells include neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells or progenitors such as endothelial precursor cells. Different cell surface markers help classify these cells types. Hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial precursor cells are involved in angiogenesis. Numerous hypoxia-regulated factors have been implicated in angiogenesis, including vascular endothelial growth factor, stromal derived factor-1, insulin-like growth factor, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Progenitor cells, found amongst both early (CD34+) or late (CD14+) blood mononuclear cells, are impaired in diabetes. Studying these types of cells, along with others, can dissect the precise molecular mechanisms underlying stem/progenitor cell activity in the retina.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84926092025&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84926092025&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1159/000262669

DO - 10.1159/000262669

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84926092025

SN - 9783805592765

SN - 9783805592758

VL - 20

SP - 174

EP - 193

BT - Experimental Approaches to Diabetic Retinopathy

PB - S. Karger AG

ER -