Stent-based nitric oxide delivery reducing neointimal proliferation in a porcine carotid overstretch injury model

Dongming Hou, Hugh Narciso, Kirti Kamdar, Ping Zhang, Bruce Barclay, Keith L. March

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The effects of nitric acid (NO) on vessel response to injury include the inhibition of platelet adhesion, platelet aggregation, leukocyte adhesion and smooth muscle cell proliferation. Releasing NO from a stent might reduce the clinical problem of restenosis. The present study was designed to examine whether an NO-eluting covered stent can prevent neointimal formation in a porcine carotid overstretch injury model. Methods: The interior of a self-expanding polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-covered aSpire stent was coated with silicone, which contained 23.6 μg or 54.5 μg sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO-releasing compound). The stent was implanted into carotid artery. Six pigs were implanted with stents, one high-dose SNP and one uncoated control, following balloon overstretch injury of the carotid artery with a balloon-to-artery ratio of 1.3:1. Results: No local or systemic toxicity was evidenced in the six pigs after carotid artery implantation with either low- or high-dose stents within a week. At day 28, the mean intimal thickness was 0.12 ± 0.05 mm for NO-eluting stents and 0.43 ± 0.09 mm for uncoated stents (p = 0.008). The mean neointimal area was reduced from 2.40 ± 0.39 mm2 for control stents to 0.49 ± 0.16 mm2 for NO-eluting stents (p < 0.0001), which resulted in a 24% reduction of angiographic vessel narrowing. Conclusions: The NO-eluting ePTFE-covered stent is feasible and effectively reduces in-stent neointimal hyperplasia at 28 days in a porcine carotid overstretch model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-65
Number of pages6
JournalCardioVascular and Interventional Radiology
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Stents
Nitric Oxide
Swine
Wounds and Injuries
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Carotid Arteries
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Carotid Artery Injuries
Tunica Intima
Nitric Acid
Nitroprusside
Silicones
Platelet Aggregation
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Hyperplasia
Leukocytes
Blood Platelets
Arteries
Cell Proliferation

Keywords

  • Balloon injury
  • Carotid
  • NO
  • Stent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Stent-based nitric oxide delivery reducing neointimal proliferation in a porcine carotid overstretch injury model. / Hou, Dongming; Narciso, Hugh; Kamdar, Kirti; Zhang, Ping; Barclay, Bruce; March, Keith L.

In: CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 60-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hou, Dongming ; Narciso, Hugh ; Kamdar, Kirti ; Zhang, Ping ; Barclay, Bruce ; March, Keith L. / Stent-based nitric oxide delivery reducing neointimal proliferation in a porcine carotid overstretch injury model. In: CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. 2005 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 60-65.
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