Stimulus tracking in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI)

James Ford, Fillia Makedon, Tilmann Steinberg, Charles Owen, Sterling Johnson, Andrew Saykin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imagery (fMRI) is a new medical imaging technology providing functional, as opposed to anatomical, mapping of the human brain. The promise of this non-invasive technique has opened new challenges for multimedia researchers. As the field of human functional neuroimaging explodes and the technology of fMRI advances, computational techniques for experiment control, subject stimuli generation, and joint stimuli-activation tracking are lacking. Most computational work has focused on improving the analysis of the brain scans. This paper describes computational mechanisms for the delivery and tracking of multimedia stimuli and a correlation framework for stimuli and brain responses. MediaStim, a new integrated data collection framework for stimulus tracking that is currently under development. MediaStim extends the stimuli paradigm to composite multimedia presentations. To simulate a real-life situation as realistically as possible, it is important to study the brain response using "immersive" stimuli, and have tools that record this interaction over time in an environment that is totally quantified and reproducible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA 1998
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages445-454
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)0201309904, 9780201309904
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes
Event6th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA 1998 - Bristol, United Kingdom
Duration: Sep 13 2014Sep 16 2014

Other

Other6th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA 1998
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBristol
Period9/13/149/16/14

Fingerprint

Brain
Magnetic resonance
Functional neuroimaging
Medical imaging
Chemical activation
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Composite materials
Experiments

Keywords

  • FMRI
  • Multimedia analysis tools

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

Cite this

Ford, J., Makedon, F., Steinberg, T., Owen, C., Johnson, S., & Saykin, A. (1998). Stimulus tracking in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). In Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA 1998 (pp. 445-454). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/290747.290819

Stimulus tracking in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). / Ford, James; Makedon, Fillia; Steinberg, Tilmann; Owen, Charles; Johnson, Sterling; Saykin, Andrew.

Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA 1998. Association for Computing Machinery, 1998. p. 445-454.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ford, J, Makedon, F, Steinberg, T, Owen, C, Johnson, S & Saykin, A 1998, Stimulus tracking in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). in Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA 1998. Association for Computing Machinery, pp. 445-454, 6th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA 1998, Bristol, United Kingdom, 9/13/14. https://doi.org/10.1145/290747.290819
Ford J, Makedon F, Steinberg T, Owen C, Johnson S, Saykin A. Stimulus tracking in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). In Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA 1998. Association for Computing Machinery. 1998. p. 445-454 https://doi.org/10.1145/290747.290819
Ford, James ; Makedon, Fillia ; Steinberg, Tilmann ; Owen, Charles ; Johnson, Sterling ; Saykin, Andrew. / Stimulus tracking in functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Proceedings of the 6th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, MULTIMEDIA 1998. Association for Computing Machinery, 1998. pp. 445-454
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