Stool microbiota composition is associated with the prospective risk of Plasmodium falciparum infection

Shibu Yooseph, Ewen F. Kirkness, Tuan  Tran, Derek M. Harkins, Marcus B. Jones, Manolito G. Torralba, Elise O'Connell, Thomas B. Nutman, Safiatou Doumbo, Ogobara K. Doumbo, Boubacar Traore, Peter D. Crompton, Karen E. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In humans it is unknown if the composition of the gut microbiota alters the risk of Plasmodium falciparum infection or the risk of developing febrile malaria once P. falciparum infection is established. Here we collected stool samples from a cohort composed of 195 Malian children and adults just prior to an intense P. falciparum transmission season. We assayed these samples using massively parallel sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene to identify the composition of the gut bacterial communities in these individuals. During the ensuing 6-month P. falciparum transmission season we examined the relationship between the stool microbiota composition of individuals in this cohort and their prospective risk of both P. falciparum infection and febrile malaria. Results: Consistent with prior studies, stool microbial diversity in the present cohort increased with age, although the overall microbiota profile was distinct from cohorts in other regions of Africa, Asia and North America. Age-adjusted Cox regression analysis revealed a significant association between microbiota composition and the prospective risk of P. falciparum infection; however, no relationship was observed between microbiota composition and the risk of developing febrile malaria once P. falciparum infection was established. Conclusions: These findings underscore the diversity of gut microbiota across geographic regions, and suggest that strategic modulation of gut microbiota composition could decrease the risk of P. falciparum infection in malaria-endemic areas, potentially as an adjunct to partially effective malaria vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number631
JournalBMC Genomics
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 22 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Microbiota
Plasmodium falciparum
Malaria
Fever
16S Ribosomal RNA
Malaria Vaccines
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
North America
rRNA Genes
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • 16S rRNA gene sequencing
  • Gut microbiota
  • Human
  • Malaria
  • Plasmodium falciparum
  • Prospective cohort
  • Stool microbiota

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Yooseph, S., Kirkness, E. F., Tran, T., Harkins, D. M., Jones, M. B., Torralba, M. G., ... Nelson, K. E. (2015). Stool microbiota composition is associated with the prospective risk of Plasmodium falciparum infection. BMC Genomics, 16(1), [631]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12864-015-1819-3

Stool microbiota composition is associated with the prospective risk of Plasmodium falciparum infection. / Yooseph, Shibu; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Tran, Tuan ; Harkins, Derek M.; Jones, Marcus B.; Torralba, Manolito G.; O'Connell, Elise; Nutman, Thomas B.; Doumbo, Safiatou; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Traore, Boubacar; Crompton, Peter D.; Nelson, Karen E.

In: BMC Genomics, Vol. 16, No. 1, 631, 22.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yooseph, S, Kirkness, EF, Tran, T, Harkins, DM, Jones, MB, Torralba, MG, O'Connell, E, Nutman, TB, Doumbo, S, Doumbo, OK, Traore, B, Crompton, PD & Nelson, KE 2015, 'Stool microbiota composition is associated with the prospective risk of Plasmodium falciparum infection', BMC Genomics, vol. 16, no. 1, 631. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12864-015-1819-3
Yooseph, Shibu ; Kirkness, Ewen F. ; Tran, Tuan  ; Harkins, Derek M. ; Jones, Marcus B. ; Torralba, Manolito G. ; O'Connell, Elise ; Nutman, Thomas B. ; Doumbo, Safiatou ; Doumbo, Ogobara K. ; Traore, Boubacar ; Crompton, Peter D. ; Nelson, Karen E. / Stool microbiota composition is associated with the prospective risk of Plasmodium falciparum infection. In: BMC Genomics. 2015 ; Vol. 16, No. 1.
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AU - Torralba, Manolito G.

AU - O'Connell, Elise

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AU - Doumbo, Safiatou

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