Stress fractures

Pathophysiology, epidemiology, and risk factors

Stuart J. Warden, David Burr, Peter D. Brukner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A stress fracture represents the inability of the skeleton to withstand repetitive bouts of mechanical loading, which results in structural fatigue and resultant signs and symptoms of localized pain and tenderness. To prevent stress fractures, an appreciation of their risk factors is required. These are typically grouped into extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors. Extrinsic risk factors for stress fractures are those in the environment or external to the individual, including the type of activity and factors involving training, equipment, and the environment. Intrinsic risk factors for stress fractures refer to characteristics within the individual, including skeletal, muscle, joint, and biomechanical factors, as well as physical fitness and gender. This article discusses these extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors, as well as the pathophysiology and epidemiology of stress fractures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-109
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Osteoporosis Reports
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Stress Fractures
Epidemiology
Intrinsic Factor
Physical Fitness
Skeleton
Signs and Symptoms
Fatigue
Skeletal Muscle
Joints
Pain
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Stress fractures : Pathophysiology, epidemiology, and risk factors. / Warden, Stuart J.; Burr, David; Brukner, Peter D.

In: Current Osteoporosis Reports, Vol. 4, No. 3, 09.2006, p. 103-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Warden, Stuart J. ; Burr, David ; Brukner, Peter D. / Stress fractures : Pathophysiology, epidemiology, and risk factors. In: Current Osteoporosis Reports. 2006 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 103-109.
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