Structured practice opportunities with a mnemonic affect medical student interviewing skills for intimate partner violence

Elizabeth A. Edwardsen, Diane S. Morse, Richard Frankel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Low rates of partner violence inquiry and detection are reported in the medical setting. Purpose: To determine if a teaching module with a mnemonic improves interviewing skills. Method: Prospective randomized trial. A total of 43 medical students were assigned to either the intervention group (teaching module with guided discussion and practice highlighting use of a mnemonic) or the control group (general discussion and provision of the mnemonic at the end of the session). These students subsequently interviewed simulated patients. Results: A total of 75% of the intervention group and 62% of the control group reported the mnemonic was helpful. A total of 68% of the intervention group and 45% of the control group asked a direct question about partner violence. Students who obtained a history of abuse consistently asked direct, nonjudgmental question(s). Conclusions: Students learn to perform desired interviewing skills more frequently when they have the benefit of guided discussion, practice, and memory aids.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-68
Number of pages7
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

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Medical Students
medical student
violence
Students
Violence
Group
Control Groups
Teaching
student
Practice (Psychology)
Intimate Partner Violence
abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Structured practice opportunities with a mnemonic affect medical student interviewing skills for intimate partner violence. / Edwardsen, Elizabeth A.; Morse, Diane S.; Frankel, Richard.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 1, 12.2006, p. 62-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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