Student and faculty performance in clinical simulations with access to a searchable information resource.

V. A. Abraham, C. P. Friedman, B. M. Wildemuth, Stephen Downs, P. J. Kantrowitz, E. N. Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we explore how students' use of an easily accessible and searchable database affects their performance in clinical simulations. We do this by comparing performance of students with and without database access and compare these to a sample of faculty members. The literature supports the fact that interactive information resources can augment a clinician's problem solving ability in small clinical vignettes. We have taken the INQUIRER bacteriological database, containing detailed information on 63 medically important bacteria in 33 structured fields, and incorporated it into a computer-based clinical simulation. Subjects worked through the case-based clinical simulations with some having access to the INQUIRER information resource. Performance metrics were based on correct determination of the etiologic agent in the simulation and crosstabulated with student access of the information resource; more specifically it was determined whether the student displayed the database record describing the etiologic agent. Chi-square tests show statistical significance for this relationship (chi 2 = 3.922; p = 0.048). Results support the idea that students with database access in a clinical simulation environment can perform at a higher level than their counterparts who lack access to such information, reflecting favorably on the use of information resources in training environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)648-652
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings / AMIA ... Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Databases
Students
Access to Information
Aptitude
Chi-Square Distribution
Bacteria

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Student and faculty performance in clinical simulations with access to a searchable information resource. / Abraham, V. A.; Friedman, C. P.; Wildemuth, B. M.; Downs, Stephen; Kantrowitz, P. J.; Robinson, E. N.

In: Proceedings / AMIA ... Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium, 1999, p. 648-652.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abraham, V. A. ; Friedman, C. P. ; Wildemuth, B. M. ; Downs, Stephen ; Kantrowitz, P. J. ; Robinson, E. N. / Student and faculty performance in clinical simulations with access to a searchable information resource. In: Proceedings / AMIA ... Annual Symposium. AMIA Symposium. 1999 ; pp. 648-652.
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