Studies of PAG/PVG stimulation for pain relief in humans

Nicholas M. Barbaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter discusses the studies of periaqueductal gray (PAG)/ periventricular gray (PVG) stimulation for pain relief in humans. PAG electrical stimulation produce a profound analgesia without other obvious neurological effects. A major difference between stimulation of human PAC and techniques used in animal studies is that, it is not possible to determine whether a particular electrode is effective in relieving pain during the initial implantation procedure in human subjects. Early studies indicated that SPA could be at least partially blocked by systemically-administered naloxone. The analgesic effects seen in the animals are of immediate onset and are often short-lived, while those in humans have a slower onset and last longer. Electrical stimulation of the PAG is used for the treatment of patients with severe, medically-refractory pain problems. Well-designed prospective studies are essential for a better understanding of analgesic mechanisms in humans to improve success rates for this procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-173
Number of pages9
JournalProgress in Brain Research
Volume77
Issue numberC
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1988

Fingerprint

Periaqueductal Gray
Pain
Electric Stimulation
Analgesics
Intractable Pain
Naloxone
Analgesia
Electrodes
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Studies of PAG/PVG stimulation for pain relief in humans. / Barbaro, Nicholas M.

In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 77, No. C, 01.1988, p. 165-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barbaro, Nicholas M. / Studies of PAG/PVG stimulation for pain relief in humans. In: Progress in Brain Research. 1988 ; Vol. 77, No. C. pp. 165-173.
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