Success of uterus-preserving treatments for abnormal uterine bleeding, chronic pelvic pain, and symptomatic fibroids: Age and bridges to menopause

Lee A. Learman, Sanae Nakagawa, Steven E. Gregorich, Rebecca A. Jackson, Alison Jacoby, Miriam Kuppermann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether age at first uterus-preserving treatment (UPT) predicts symptom resolution among women with common pelvic problems. Study Design: We conducted an analysis of 557 participants in the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy and Intervention Alternatives cohort who reported having undergone a UPT. We performed multivariable regression modeling age at first UPT, hysterectomy, menopause, and other covariates to predict symptom resolution. Results: Mean ± SD age at enrollment was 42.7 ± 4.7 years; mean follow-up time was 4.4 ± 2.7 years. Sixteen percent of the women underwent hysterectomy; 37% of the women entered menopause. Hysterectomy was a strong predictor of symptom resolution (P < .001). Compared with women who were younger (first UPT at age <40 years), older women reported greater symptom resolution, even after the data were controlled for hysterectomy use and menopausal status (P = .028). Conclusion: Women who are <40 years old when they undergo their first uterus-preserving treatment experience greater symptom resolution than younger women. Framing UPTs as hysterectomy alternatives may be accurate only for a subset of women who are >40 years old.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)272.e1-272.e7
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume204
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

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Pelvic Pain
Uterine Hemorrhage
Leiomyoma
Menopause
Hysterectomy
Chronic Pain
Uterus
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Success of uterus-preserving treatments for abnormal uterine bleeding, chronic pelvic pain, and symptomatic fibroids : Age and bridges to menopause. / Learman, Lee A.; Nakagawa, Sanae; Gregorich, Steven E.; Jackson, Rebecca A.; Jacoby, Alison; Kuppermann, Miriam.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 204, No. 3, 03.2011, p. 272.e1-272.e7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Learman, Lee A. ; Nakagawa, Sanae ; Gregorich, Steven E. ; Jackson, Rebecca A. ; Jacoby, Alison ; Kuppermann, Miriam. / Success of uterus-preserving treatments for abnormal uterine bleeding, chronic pelvic pain, and symptomatic fibroids : Age and bridges to menopause. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2011 ; Vol. 204, No. 3. pp. 272.e1-272.e7.
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