Summary measures of occupational history

A comparison of latest occupation and industry with usual occupation and industry

W. R. Illis, G. M. Swanson, E. R. Satariano, A. G. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The utility of using latest occupational information as a summary of work history is assessed by comparing it to usual occupation and industry. We analyzed 5,734 complete occupational histories obtained by telephone interview as part of an ongoing occupational cancer surveillance study. Of these, 73.6 per cent reported the same usual occupation as latest occupation and 76.6 per cent the same usual industry as latest industry. Differences in match rates by race and sex, occupation and industry titles and categories suggest that bias may result in studies using latest occupation or industry as a summary measure of occupational exposures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1532-1534
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume77
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Occupations
Industry
Sex Work
Occupational Exposure
Interviews
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Summary measures of occupational history : A comparison of latest occupation and industry with usual occupation and industry. / Illis, W. R.; Swanson, G. M.; Satariano, E. R.; Schwartz, A. G.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 77, No. 12, 1987, p. 1532-1534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Illis, W. R. ; Swanson, G. M. ; Satariano, E. R. ; Schwartz, A. G. / Summary measures of occupational history : A comparison of latest occupation and industry with usual occupation and industry. In: American Journal of Public Health. 1987 ; Vol. 77, No. 12. pp. 1532-1534.
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