Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea in infants and young toddlers

Joseph S. Brigance, R. Christopher Miyamoto, Peter Schilt, Derek Houston, Jennifer L. Wiebke, Deborah Givan, Bruce Matt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Review surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in infants and young toddlers compared with a medically treated group. Study Design: Case series with chart review of children younger than 24 months treated at a tertiary pediatric hospital between 2000 and 2005. Subjects and Methods: Surgical treatment included adenotonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, and tonsillectomy. Polysomnography results, comorbidities, and major complications were recorded. The change in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) before and after treatment was analyzed. Logistic regression analysis reviewed effects of comorbidities and OSA severity on complications. Results: A total of 73 children met inclusion criteria. The surgical treatment group (AHI) improved posttreatment: mean AHI change was 9.6 (95% CI, 5.8-13.4). The medical treatment group did not improve posttreatment: mean AHI change was -3.0 (95% CI, -15.1 to 9.1). The difference in AHI change between surgical and medical groups was 12.56 (95% CI, 2.7-22.4). An independent t test found this difference to be statistically significant (P = 0.01). Eleven (18%) patients suffered significant postoperative surgical complications; 55 surgical patients and 8 medical patients had comorbidities. There were no long-term morbidities or mortalities. Conclusions: AHI in the surgically treated group significantly improved. The complication rate for a tertiary pediatric hospital population that included patients with multiple comorbidities was acceptable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)912-916
Number of pages5
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume140
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Apnea
Comorbidity
Pediatric Hospitals
Tertiary Care Centers
Adenoidectomy
Tonsillectomy
Polysomnography
Therapeutics
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Morbidity
Mortality
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea in infants and young toddlers. / Brigance, Joseph S.; Miyamoto, R. Christopher; Schilt, Peter; Houston, Derek; Wiebke, Jennifer L.; Givan, Deborah; Matt, Bruce.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 140, No. 6, 06.2009, p. 912-916.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brigance, JS, Miyamoto, RC, Schilt, P, Houston, D, Wiebke, JL, Givan, D & Matt, B 2009, 'Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea in infants and young toddlers', Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 140, no. 6, pp. 912-916. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.otohns.2009.01.034
Brigance, Joseph S. ; Miyamoto, R. Christopher ; Schilt, Peter ; Houston, Derek ; Wiebke, Jennifer L. ; Givan, Deborah ; Matt, Bruce. / Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnea in infants and young toddlers. In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 2009 ; Vol. 140, No. 6. pp. 912-916.
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