Symptom resolution after hysterectomy and alternative treatments for chronic pelvic pain: Does depression make a difference?

Lee A. Learman, Steven E. Gregorich, Michael Schembri, Alison Jacoby, Rebecca A. Jackson, Miriam Kuppermann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether depression influences treatment outcomes and to identify predictors of symptom resolution among women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP). Study Design: Analysis of 701 women with CPP in the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy and Intervention Alternatives prospective cohort study, which included 153 women (22%) with depression. We conducted multivariable analyses to evaluate the influence of depression on pre-/posttreatment differences in symptoms and health-related quality of life and to identify other predictors of symptom improvement. Results: CPP treatments included hysterectomy (9%), other surgical treatments (9%), hormonal medications (50%), narcotic analgesics (47%), physical therapy (12%), and nonprescription medications (93%). Depression predicted lower gains in health perception (P < .05) but not in symptom resolution, sexual functioning, or other aspects of health-related quality of life. Symptom resolution was predicted by hysterectomy (P < .001), entering menopause (P < .001), and pretreatment satisfaction with sex (P = .039). Conclusion: Depression does not influence substantially treatment-related gains in CPP symptom resolution and health-related quality of life. Coexisting depression should not delay treatment for CPP.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume204
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Pelvic Pain
Hysterectomy
Chronic Pain
Depression
Quality of Life
Therapeutics
Narcotics
Menopause
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Symptom resolution after hysterectomy and alternative treatments for chronic pelvic pain : Does depression make a difference? / Learman, Lee A.; Gregorich, Steven E.; Schembri, Michael; Jacoby, Alison; Jackson, Rebecca A.; Kuppermann, Miriam.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 204, No. 3, 03.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Learman, Lee A. ; Gregorich, Steven E. ; Schembri, Michael ; Jacoby, Alison ; Jackson, Rebecca A. ; Kuppermann, Miriam. / Symptom resolution after hysterectomy and alternative treatments for chronic pelvic pain : Does depression make a difference?. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2011 ; Vol. 204, No. 3.
@article{456cfc5f307a49618ffe34fad7345592,
title = "Symptom resolution after hysterectomy and alternative treatments for chronic pelvic pain: Does depression make a difference?",
abstract = "Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether depression influences treatment outcomes and to identify predictors of symptom resolution among women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP). Study Design: Analysis of 701 women with CPP in the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy and Intervention Alternatives prospective cohort study, which included 153 women (22{\%}) with depression. We conducted multivariable analyses to evaluate the influence of depression on pre-/posttreatment differences in symptoms and health-related quality of life and to identify other predictors of symptom improvement. Results: CPP treatments included hysterectomy (9{\%}), other surgical treatments (9{\%}), hormonal medications (50{\%}), narcotic analgesics (47{\%}), physical therapy (12{\%}), and nonprescription medications (93{\%}). Depression predicted lower gains in health perception (P < .05) but not in symptom resolution, sexual functioning, or other aspects of health-related quality of life. Symptom resolution was predicted by hysterectomy (P < .001), entering menopause (P < .001), and pretreatment satisfaction with sex (P = .039). Conclusion: Depression does not influence substantially treatment-related gains in CPP symptom resolution and health-related quality of life. Coexisting depression should not delay treatment for CPP.",
author = "Learman, {Lee A.} and Gregorich, {Steven E.} and Michael Schembri and Alison Jacoby and Jackson, {Rebecca A.} and Miriam Kuppermann",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajog.2010.12.051",
language = "English",
volume = "204",
journal = "American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0002-9378",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Symptom resolution after hysterectomy and alternative treatments for chronic pelvic pain

T2 - Does depression make a difference?

AU - Learman, Lee A.

AU - Gregorich, Steven E.

AU - Schembri, Michael

AU - Jacoby, Alison

AU - Jackson, Rebecca A.

AU - Kuppermann, Miriam

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether depression influences treatment outcomes and to identify predictors of symptom resolution among women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP). Study Design: Analysis of 701 women with CPP in the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy and Intervention Alternatives prospective cohort study, which included 153 women (22%) with depression. We conducted multivariable analyses to evaluate the influence of depression on pre-/posttreatment differences in symptoms and health-related quality of life and to identify other predictors of symptom improvement. Results: CPP treatments included hysterectomy (9%), other surgical treatments (9%), hormonal medications (50%), narcotic analgesics (47%), physical therapy (12%), and nonprescription medications (93%). Depression predicted lower gains in health perception (P < .05) but not in symptom resolution, sexual functioning, or other aspects of health-related quality of life. Symptom resolution was predicted by hysterectomy (P < .001), entering menopause (P < .001), and pretreatment satisfaction with sex (P = .039). Conclusion: Depression does not influence substantially treatment-related gains in CPP symptom resolution and health-related quality of life. Coexisting depression should not delay treatment for CPP.

AB - Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether depression influences treatment outcomes and to identify predictors of symptom resolution among women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP). Study Design: Analysis of 701 women with CPP in the Study of Pelvic Problems, Hysterectomy and Intervention Alternatives prospective cohort study, which included 153 women (22%) with depression. We conducted multivariable analyses to evaluate the influence of depression on pre-/posttreatment differences in symptoms and health-related quality of life and to identify other predictors of symptom improvement. Results: CPP treatments included hysterectomy (9%), other surgical treatments (9%), hormonal medications (50%), narcotic analgesics (47%), physical therapy (12%), and nonprescription medications (93%). Depression predicted lower gains in health perception (P < .05) but not in symptom resolution, sexual functioning, or other aspects of health-related quality of life. Symptom resolution was predicted by hysterectomy (P < .001), entering menopause (P < .001), and pretreatment satisfaction with sex (P = .039). Conclusion: Depression does not influence substantially treatment-related gains in CPP symptom resolution and health-related quality of life. Coexisting depression should not delay treatment for CPP.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952289484&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952289484&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajog.2010.12.051

DO - 10.1016/j.ajog.2010.12.051

M3 - Article

C2 - 21376168

AN - SCOPUS:79952289484

VL - 204

JO - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0002-9378

IS - 3

ER -