Synthetic osteogenic extracellular matrix formed by coated silicon dioxide nanosprings

Jamie L. Hass, Erin M. Garrison, Sarah A. Wicher, Ben Knapp, Nathan Bridges, D. N. Mcllroy, Gustavo Arrizabalaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The design of biomimetic materials that parallel the morphology and biology of extracellular matrixes is key to the ability to grow functional tissues in vitro and to enhance the integration of biomaterial implants into existing tissues in vivo. Special attention has been put into mimicking the nanostructures of the extracellular matrix of bone, as there is a need to find biomaterials that can enhance the bonding between orthopedic devices and this tissue.Methods: We have tested the ability of normal human osteoblasts to propagate and differentiate on silicon dioxide nanosprings, which can be easily grown on practically any surface. In addition, we tested different metals and metal alloys as coats for the nanosprings in tissue culture experiments with bone cells.Results: Normal human osteoblasts grown on coated nanosprings exhibited an enhanced rate of propagation, differentiation into bone forming cells and mineralization. While osteoblasts did not attach effectively to bare nanowires grown on glass, these cells propagated successfully on nanosprings coated with titanium oxide and gold. We observed a 270 fold increase in the division rate of osteoblasts when grow on titanium/gold coated nanosprings. This effect was shown to be dependent on the nanosprings, as the coating by themselves did not alter the growth rate of osteoblast. We also observed that titanium/zinc/gold coated nanosprings increased the levels of osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase seven folds. This result indicates that osteoblasts grown on this metal alloy coated nanosprings are differentiating to mature bone making cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that osteoblasts grown on the same metal alloy coated nanosprings have an enhanced ability to deposit calcium salt.Conclusion: We have established that metal/metal alloy coated silicon dioxide nanosprings can be used as a biomimetic material paralleling the morphology and biology of osteogenic extracellular matrix. The coated nanosprings enhance normal human osteoblasts cellular behaviors needed for improving osseointegration of orthopedic materials. Thus, metal-coated nanosprings represent a novel biomaterial that could be exploited for improving success rates of orthopedic implant procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6
JournalJournal of Nanobiotechnology
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 27 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Osteoblasts
Silicon Dioxide
Extracellular Matrix
Silica
Metals
Biomimetic Materials
Bone
Orthopedics
Biocompatible Materials
Biomimetic materials
Biomaterials
Gold
Bone and Bones
Tissue
Titanium
Nanowires
Orthopedic Procedures
Osseointegration
Tissue culture
Nanostructures

Keywords

  • Bone regeneration
  • Calcification
  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanosprings
  • Osseointegration
  • Osteoblasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Synthetic osteogenic extracellular matrix formed by coated silicon dioxide nanosprings. / Hass, Jamie L.; Garrison, Erin M.; Wicher, Sarah A.; Knapp, Ben; Bridges, Nathan; Mcllroy, D. N.; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo.

In: Journal of Nanobiotechnology, Vol. 10, 6, 27.01.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hass, Jamie L. ; Garrison, Erin M. ; Wicher, Sarah A. ; Knapp, Ben ; Bridges, Nathan ; Mcllroy, D. N. ; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo. / Synthetic osteogenic extracellular matrix formed by coated silicon dioxide nanosprings. In: Journal of Nanobiotechnology. 2012 ; Vol. 10.
@article{e8159f8c60924f2dbc6833ea75357269,
title = "Synthetic osteogenic extracellular matrix formed by coated silicon dioxide nanosprings",
abstract = "Background: The design of biomimetic materials that parallel the morphology and biology of extracellular matrixes is key to the ability to grow functional tissues in vitro and to enhance the integration of biomaterial implants into existing tissues in vivo. Special attention has been put into mimicking the nanostructures of the extracellular matrix of bone, as there is a need to find biomaterials that can enhance the bonding between orthopedic devices and this tissue.Methods: We have tested the ability of normal human osteoblasts to propagate and differentiate on silicon dioxide nanosprings, which can be easily grown on practically any surface. In addition, we tested different metals and metal alloys as coats for the nanosprings in tissue culture experiments with bone cells.Results: Normal human osteoblasts grown on coated nanosprings exhibited an enhanced rate of propagation, differentiation into bone forming cells and mineralization. While osteoblasts did not attach effectively to bare nanowires grown on glass, these cells propagated successfully on nanosprings coated with titanium oxide and gold. We observed a 270 fold increase in the division rate of osteoblasts when grow on titanium/gold coated nanosprings. This effect was shown to be dependent on the nanosprings, as the coating by themselves did not alter the growth rate of osteoblast. We also observed that titanium/zinc/gold coated nanosprings increased the levels of osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase seven folds. This result indicates that osteoblasts grown on this metal alloy coated nanosprings are differentiating to mature bone making cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that osteoblasts grown on the same metal alloy coated nanosprings have an enhanced ability to deposit calcium salt.Conclusion: We have established that metal/metal alloy coated silicon dioxide nanosprings can be used as a biomimetic material paralleling the morphology and biology of osteogenic extracellular matrix. The coated nanosprings enhance normal human osteoblasts cellular behaviors needed for improving osseointegration of orthopedic materials. Thus, metal-coated nanosprings represent a novel biomaterial that could be exploited for improving success rates of orthopedic implant procedures.",
keywords = "Bone regeneration, Calcification, Nanomaterials, Nanosprings, Osseointegration, Osteoblasts",
author = "Hass, {Jamie L.} and Garrison, {Erin M.} and Wicher, {Sarah A.} and Ben Knapp and Nathan Bridges and Mcllroy, {D. N.} and Gustavo Arrizabalaga",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1186/1477-3155-10-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
journal = "Journal of Nanobiotechnology",
issn = "1477-3155",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Synthetic osteogenic extracellular matrix formed by coated silicon dioxide nanosprings

AU - Hass, Jamie L.

AU - Garrison, Erin M.

AU - Wicher, Sarah A.

AU - Knapp, Ben

AU - Bridges, Nathan

AU - Mcllroy, D. N.

AU - Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

PY - 2012/1/27

Y1 - 2012/1/27

N2 - Background: The design of biomimetic materials that parallel the morphology and biology of extracellular matrixes is key to the ability to grow functional tissues in vitro and to enhance the integration of biomaterial implants into existing tissues in vivo. Special attention has been put into mimicking the nanostructures of the extracellular matrix of bone, as there is a need to find biomaterials that can enhance the bonding between orthopedic devices and this tissue.Methods: We have tested the ability of normal human osteoblasts to propagate and differentiate on silicon dioxide nanosprings, which can be easily grown on practically any surface. In addition, we tested different metals and metal alloys as coats for the nanosprings in tissue culture experiments with bone cells.Results: Normal human osteoblasts grown on coated nanosprings exhibited an enhanced rate of propagation, differentiation into bone forming cells and mineralization. While osteoblasts did not attach effectively to bare nanowires grown on glass, these cells propagated successfully on nanosprings coated with titanium oxide and gold. We observed a 270 fold increase in the division rate of osteoblasts when grow on titanium/gold coated nanosprings. This effect was shown to be dependent on the nanosprings, as the coating by themselves did not alter the growth rate of osteoblast. We also observed that titanium/zinc/gold coated nanosprings increased the levels of osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase seven folds. This result indicates that osteoblasts grown on this metal alloy coated nanosprings are differentiating to mature bone making cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that osteoblasts grown on the same metal alloy coated nanosprings have an enhanced ability to deposit calcium salt.Conclusion: We have established that metal/metal alloy coated silicon dioxide nanosprings can be used as a biomimetic material paralleling the morphology and biology of osteogenic extracellular matrix. The coated nanosprings enhance normal human osteoblasts cellular behaviors needed for improving osseointegration of orthopedic materials. Thus, metal-coated nanosprings represent a novel biomaterial that could be exploited for improving success rates of orthopedic implant procedures.

AB - Background: The design of biomimetic materials that parallel the morphology and biology of extracellular matrixes is key to the ability to grow functional tissues in vitro and to enhance the integration of biomaterial implants into existing tissues in vivo. Special attention has been put into mimicking the nanostructures of the extracellular matrix of bone, as there is a need to find biomaterials that can enhance the bonding between orthopedic devices and this tissue.Methods: We have tested the ability of normal human osteoblasts to propagate and differentiate on silicon dioxide nanosprings, which can be easily grown on practically any surface. In addition, we tested different metals and metal alloys as coats for the nanosprings in tissue culture experiments with bone cells.Results: Normal human osteoblasts grown on coated nanosprings exhibited an enhanced rate of propagation, differentiation into bone forming cells and mineralization. While osteoblasts did not attach effectively to bare nanowires grown on glass, these cells propagated successfully on nanosprings coated with titanium oxide and gold. We observed a 270 fold increase in the division rate of osteoblasts when grow on titanium/gold coated nanosprings. This effect was shown to be dependent on the nanosprings, as the coating by themselves did not alter the growth rate of osteoblast. We also observed that titanium/zinc/gold coated nanosprings increased the levels of osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase seven folds. This result indicates that osteoblasts grown on this metal alloy coated nanosprings are differentiating to mature bone making cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that osteoblasts grown on the same metal alloy coated nanosprings have an enhanced ability to deposit calcium salt.Conclusion: We have established that metal/metal alloy coated silicon dioxide nanosprings can be used as a biomimetic material paralleling the morphology and biology of osteogenic extracellular matrix. The coated nanosprings enhance normal human osteoblasts cellular behaviors needed for improving osseointegration of orthopedic materials. Thus, metal-coated nanosprings represent a novel biomaterial that could be exploited for improving success rates of orthopedic implant procedures.

KW - Bone regeneration

KW - Calcification

KW - Nanomaterials

KW - Nanosprings

KW - Osseointegration

KW - Osteoblasts

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84856206207&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84856206207&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1477-3155-10-6

DO - 10.1186/1477-3155-10-6

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - Journal of Nanobiotechnology

JF - Journal of Nanobiotechnology

SN - 1477-3155

M1 - 6

ER -