Systematic method for determining intravenous drug treatment strategies aiding the humoral immune response

Ann E. Rundeil, Raymond Decarlo, Venkataramanan Balakrishnan, Harm HogenEsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper delineates a systematic method for determining 'optimal' intravenous drug delivery strategies for patients having illnesses that primarily evoke a humoral immune response and are treatable by antibiotics. The method derives from a nonlinear, distributed predator-prey model that captures the dominant antigen and antibody interaction. This model is developed from relevant physiology, past predator-prey-type modeling work, available data, and pertinent parameter identification. Embedding this predator-prey model into a larger class of uncertain systems, by a finite dimensional approximation and a transformation to a linear fractional representation, enables the application of robust control based on linear matrix inequality optimization techniques. The optimization problem is solved by minimizing an upper bound on a measure of the total drug delivery subject to patient recovery (stability to healthy equilibrium state). Specifically, the paper addresses the treatment of Haemophilus influenzae through modelling, controller development, and simulations of infected adult patients subjected to typical and proposed intravenous antibiotic treatments. Through simulations the proposed intravenous drug strategy shortens patient recovery time, lowers peak drug concentrations and decreases the total drug administered when compared to standard antibiotic strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-439
Number of pages11
JournalIEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drug therapy
Antibiotics
Drug delivery
Recovery
Uncertain systems
Physiology
Antigens
Robust control
Linear matrix inequalities
Antibodies
Identification (control systems)
Controllers

Keywords

  • Immune response modeling
  • Intravenous antibiotic treatment
  • Linear matrix inequalities
  • Nonlinear modeling
  • Predator-prey modeling
  • Robust control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Systematic method for determining intravenous drug treatment strategies aiding the humoral immune response. / Rundeil, Ann E.; Decarlo, Raymond; Balakrishnan, Venkataramanan; HogenEsch, Harm.

In: IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 45, No. 4, 04.1998, p. 429-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rundeil, Ann E. ; Decarlo, Raymond ; Balakrishnan, Venkataramanan ; HogenEsch, Harm. / Systematic method for determining intravenous drug treatment strategies aiding the humoral immune response. In: IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering. 1998 ; Vol. 45, No. 4. pp. 429-439.
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