Systematic review of sleep disorders in cancer patients

can the prevalence of sleep disorders be ascertained?

Julie Otte, Janet Carpenter, Shalini Manchanda, Kevin L. Rand, Todd Skaar, Michael Weaver, Yelena Chernyak, Xin Zhong, Christele Igega, Carol Landis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although sleep is vital to all human functioning and poor sleep is a known problem in cancer, it is unclear whether the overall prevalence of the various types of sleep disorders in cancer is known. The purpose of this systematic literature review was to evaluate if the prevalence of sleep disorders could be ascertained from the current body of literature regarding sleep in cancer. This was a critical and systematic review of peer-reviewed, English-language, original articles published from 1980 through 15 October 2013, identified using electronic search engines, a set of key words, and prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Information from 254 full-text, English-language articles was abstracted onto a paper checklist by one reviewer, with a second reviewer randomly verifying 50% (k = 99%). All abstracted data were entered into an electronic database, verified for accuracy, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and frequencies in SPSS (v.20) (North Castle, NY). Studies of sleep and cancer focus on specific types of symptoms of poor sleep, and there are no published prevalence studies that focus on underlying sleep disorders. Challenging the current paradigm of the way sleep is studied in cancer could produce better clinical screening tools for use in oncology clinics leading to better triaging of patients with sleep complaints to sleep specialists, and overall improvement in sleep quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-200
Number of pages18
JournalCancer Medicine
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Sleep
Neoplasms
Language
Sleep Wake Disorders
Search Engine
Peer Review
Checklist
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • review
  • sleep
  • sleep disorder
  • symptom assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Systematic review of sleep disorders in cancer patients : can the prevalence of sleep disorders be ascertained? / Otte, Julie; Carpenter, Janet; Manchanda, Shalini; Rand, Kevin L.; Skaar, Todd; Weaver, Michael; Chernyak, Yelena; Zhong, Xin; Igega, Christele; Landis, Carol.

In: Cancer Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 183-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1a7cf892314b4694ab8df449a806e99f,
title = "Systematic review of sleep disorders in cancer patients: can the prevalence of sleep disorders be ascertained?",
abstract = "Although sleep is vital to all human functioning and poor sleep is a known problem in cancer, it is unclear whether the overall prevalence of the various types of sleep disorders in cancer is known. The purpose of this systematic literature review was to evaluate if the prevalence of sleep disorders could be ascertained from the current body of literature regarding sleep in cancer. This was a critical and systematic review of peer-reviewed, English-language, original articles published from 1980 through 15 October 2013, identified using electronic search engines, a set of key words, and prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Information from 254 full-text, English-language articles was abstracted onto a paper checklist by one reviewer, with a second reviewer randomly verifying 50{\%} (k = 99{\%}). All abstracted data were entered into an electronic database, verified for accuracy, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and frequencies in SPSS (v.20) (North Castle, NY). Studies of sleep and cancer focus on specific types of symptoms of poor sleep, and there are no published prevalence studies that focus on underlying sleep disorders. Challenging the current paradigm of the way sleep is studied in cancer could produce better clinical screening tools for use in oncology clinics leading to better triaging of patients with sleep complaints to sleep specialists, and overall improvement in sleep quality.",
keywords = "Cancer, review, sleep, sleep disorder, symptom assessment",
author = "Julie Otte and Janet Carpenter and Shalini Manchanda and Rand, {Kevin L.} and Todd Skaar and Michael Weaver and Yelena Chernyak and Xin Zhong and Christele Igega and Carol Landis",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/cam4.356",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "183--200",
journal = "Cancer Medicine",
issn = "2045-7634",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Systematic review of sleep disorders in cancer patients

T2 - can the prevalence of sleep disorders be ascertained?

AU - Otte, Julie

AU - Carpenter, Janet

AU - Manchanda, Shalini

AU - Rand, Kevin L.

AU - Skaar, Todd

AU - Weaver, Michael

AU - Chernyak, Yelena

AU - Zhong, Xin

AU - Igega, Christele

AU - Landis, Carol

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Although sleep is vital to all human functioning and poor sleep is a known problem in cancer, it is unclear whether the overall prevalence of the various types of sleep disorders in cancer is known. The purpose of this systematic literature review was to evaluate if the prevalence of sleep disorders could be ascertained from the current body of literature regarding sleep in cancer. This was a critical and systematic review of peer-reviewed, English-language, original articles published from 1980 through 15 October 2013, identified using electronic search engines, a set of key words, and prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Information from 254 full-text, English-language articles was abstracted onto a paper checklist by one reviewer, with a second reviewer randomly verifying 50% (k = 99%). All abstracted data were entered into an electronic database, verified for accuracy, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and frequencies in SPSS (v.20) (North Castle, NY). Studies of sleep and cancer focus on specific types of symptoms of poor sleep, and there are no published prevalence studies that focus on underlying sleep disorders. Challenging the current paradigm of the way sleep is studied in cancer could produce better clinical screening tools for use in oncology clinics leading to better triaging of patients with sleep complaints to sleep specialists, and overall improvement in sleep quality.

AB - Although sleep is vital to all human functioning and poor sleep is a known problem in cancer, it is unclear whether the overall prevalence of the various types of sleep disorders in cancer is known. The purpose of this systematic literature review was to evaluate if the prevalence of sleep disorders could be ascertained from the current body of literature regarding sleep in cancer. This was a critical and systematic review of peer-reviewed, English-language, original articles published from 1980 through 15 October 2013, identified using electronic search engines, a set of key words, and prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Information from 254 full-text, English-language articles was abstracted onto a paper checklist by one reviewer, with a second reviewer randomly verifying 50% (k = 99%). All abstracted data were entered into an electronic database, verified for accuracy, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and frequencies in SPSS (v.20) (North Castle, NY). Studies of sleep and cancer focus on specific types of symptoms of poor sleep, and there are no published prevalence studies that focus on underlying sleep disorders. Challenging the current paradigm of the way sleep is studied in cancer could produce better clinical screening tools for use in oncology clinics leading to better triaging of patients with sleep complaints to sleep specialists, and overall improvement in sleep quality.

KW - Cancer

KW - review

KW - sleep

KW - sleep disorder

KW - symptom assessment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964696122&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84964696122&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/cam4.356

DO - 10.1002/cam4.356

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 183

EP - 200

JO - Cancer Medicine

JF - Cancer Medicine

SN - 2045-7634

IS - 2

ER -