Systems immunology of human malaria

Tuan  Tran, Babru Samal, Ewen Kirkness, Peter D. Crompton

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a global public health threat. Optimism that a highly effective malaria vaccine can be developed stems in part from the observation that humans can acquire immunity to malaria through experimental and natural . P. falciparum infection. Recent advances in systems immunology could accelerate efforts to unravel the mechanisms of acquired immunity to malaria. Here, we review the tools of systems immunology, their current limitations in the context of human malaria research, and the human 'models' of malaria immunity to which these tools can be applied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-257
Number of pages10
JournalTrends in Parasitology
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Allergy and Immunology
Malaria
Immunity
Malaria Vaccines
Falciparum Malaria
Adaptive Immunity
Plasmodium falciparum
Public Health
Research

Keywords

  • Malaria
  • Plasmodium falciparum
  • Systems immunology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Parasitology

Cite this

Tran, T., Samal, B., Kirkness, E., & Crompton, P. D. (2012). Systems immunology of human malaria. Trends in Parasitology, 28(6), 248-257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2012.03.006

Systems immunology of human malaria. / Tran, Tuan ; Samal, Babru; Kirkness, Ewen; Crompton, Peter D.

In: Trends in Parasitology, Vol. 28, No. 6, 06.2012, p. 248-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Tran, T, Samal, B, Kirkness, E & Crompton, PD 2012, 'Systems immunology of human malaria', Trends in Parasitology, vol. 28, no. 6, pp. 248-257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2012.03.006
Tran, Tuan  ; Samal, Babru ; Kirkness, Ewen ; Crompton, Peter D. / Systems immunology of human malaria. In: Trends in Parasitology. 2012 ; Vol. 28, No. 6. pp. 248-257.
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