Tattoo frequency and types among homicides and other deaths, 2007-2008: A matched case-control study

Justin Blackburn, John Cleveland, Russell Griffin, Gregory G. Davis, Jeffrey Lienert, Gerald McGwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An estimated 25% of the US population aged 18 to 50 years has a tattoo, which have been associated with markers of high-risk behaviors including alcohol and drug use, violence, carrying weapons, sexual activity, eating disorders, and suicide. This study compares tattoo prevalence and type in a homicide population to those of an age-, race-, and sex-matched control group of nonhomicide deaths. The data for this study were abstracted from autopsy records maintained by the Jefferson County Alabama Coroner/Medical Examiner's Office for the years 2007 and 2008. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between homicide and tattoo presence and characteristics were calculated using conditional logistic regression. There was no association between tattoo presence and death by homicide; however, among blacks, memorial tattoos were significantly more common among homicides compared with other types of deaths (odds ratio, 2.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-5.68). The results of the current study suggest that specific types of tattoos, but not all tattoos, may be risk factors for homicide. Other factors, such as race and lifestyle, along with tattoos may need to be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-205
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Homicide
Case-Control Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Weapons
Risk-Taking
Violence
Sexual Behavior
Suicide
Population
Life Style
Autopsy
Research Design
Logistic Models
Alcohols
Control Groups
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • case-control
  • homicide
  • tattoo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Tattoo frequency and types among homicides and other deaths, 2007-2008 : A matched case-control study. / Blackburn, Justin; Cleveland, John; Griffin, Russell; Davis, Gregory G.; Lienert, Jeffrey; McGwin, Gerald.

In: American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology, Vol. 33, No. 3, 01.09.2012, p. 202-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blackburn, Justin ; Cleveland, John ; Griffin, Russell ; Davis, Gregory G. ; Lienert, Jeffrey ; McGwin, Gerald. / Tattoo frequency and types among homicides and other deaths, 2007-2008 : A matched case-control study. In: American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology. 2012 ; Vol. 33, No. 3. pp. 202-205.
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