Teaching at the bedside maximal impact in minimal time

William Carlos, Patricia A. Kritek, Alison S. Clay, Andrew M. Luks, Carey C. Thomson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Academic physicians encounter many demands on their time including patient care, quality and performance requirements, research, and education. In an era when patient volume is prioritized and competition for research funding is intense, there is a risk that medical education will become marginalized. Bedside teaching, a responsibility of academic physicians regardless of professional track, is challenged in particular out of concern that it generates inefficiency, and distractions from direct patient care, and can distort physician-patient relationships. At the same time, the bedside is a powerful location for teaching as learners more easily engage with educational content when they can directly see its practical relevance for patient care. Also, bedside teaching enables patients and family members to engage directly in the educational process. Successful bedside teaching can be aided by consideration of four factors: climate, attention, reasoning, and evaluation. Creating a safe environment for learning and patient care is essential. We recommend that educators set expectations about use of medical jargon and engagement of the patient and family before they enter the patient room with trainees. Keep learners focused by asking relevant questions of all members of the team and by maintaining a collective leadership style. Assess and model clinical reasoning through a hypothesis-driven approach that explores the rationale for clinical decisions. Focused, specific, real-time feedback is essential for the learner to modify behaviors for future patient encounters. Together, these strategies may alleviate challenges associated with bedside teaching and ensure it remains a part of physician practice in academic medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-548
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of the American Thoracic Society
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Teaching
Patient Care
Physicians
Patient Participation
Physician-Patient Relations
Patients' Rooms
Medical Education
Climate
Research
Medicine
Learning
Education

Keywords

  • Education
  • Professional
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Teaching at the bedside maximal impact in minimal time. / Carlos, William; Kritek, Patricia A.; Clay, Alison S.; Luks, Andrew M.; Thomson, Carey C.

In: Annals of the American Thoracic Society, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 545-548.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carlos, William ; Kritek, Patricia A. ; Clay, Alison S. ; Luks, Andrew M. ; Thomson, Carey C. / Teaching at the bedside maximal impact in minimal time. In: Annals of the American Thoracic Society. 2016 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 545-548.
@article{5d39038c5a074f77b3d6b8cb58807f13,
title = "Teaching at the bedside maximal impact in minimal time",
abstract = "Academic physicians encounter many demands on their time including patient care, quality and performance requirements, research, and education. In an era when patient volume is prioritized and competition for research funding is intense, there is a risk that medical education will become marginalized. Bedside teaching, a responsibility of academic physicians regardless of professional track, is challenged in particular out of concern that it generates inefficiency, and distractions from direct patient care, and can distort physician-patient relationships. At the same time, the bedside is a powerful location for teaching as learners more easily engage with educational content when they can directly see its practical relevance for patient care. Also, bedside teaching enables patients and family members to engage directly in the educational process. Successful bedside teaching can be aided by consideration of four factors: climate, attention, reasoning, and evaluation. Creating a safe environment for learning and patient care is essential. We recommend that educators set expectations about use of medical jargon and engagement of the patient and family before they enter the patient room with trainees. Keep learners focused by asking relevant questions of all members of the team and by maintaining a collective leadership style. Assess and model clinical reasoning through a hypothesis-driven approach that explores the rationale for clinical decisions. Focused, specific, real-time feedback is essential for the learner to modify behaviors for future patient encounters. Together, these strategies may alleviate challenges associated with bedside teaching and ensure it remains a part of physician practice in academic medicine.",
keywords = "Education, Professional, Training",
author = "William Carlos and Kritek, {Patricia A.} and Clay, {Alison S.} and Luks, {Andrew M.} and Thomson, {Carey C.}",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1513/AnnalsATS.201601-018AS",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "13",
pages = "545--548",
journal = "Annals of the American Thoracic Society",
issn = "2325-6621",
publisher = "American Thoracic Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Teaching at the bedside maximal impact in minimal time

AU - Carlos, William

AU - Kritek, Patricia A.

AU - Clay, Alison S.

AU - Luks, Andrew M.

AU - Thomson, Carey C.

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - Academic physicians encounter many demands on their time including patient care, quality and performance requirements, research, and education. In an era when patient volume is prioritized and competition for research funding is intense, there is a risk that medical education will become marginalized. Bedside teaching, a responsibility of academic physicians regardless of professional track, is challenged in particular out of concern that it generates inefficiency, and distractions from direct patient care, and can distort physician-patient relationships. At the same time, the bedside is a powerful location for teaching as learners more easily engage with educational content when they can directly see its practical relevance for patient care. Also, bedside teaching enables patients and family members to engage directly in the educational process. Successful bedside teaching can be aided by consideration of four factors: climate, attention, reasoning, and evaluation. Creating a safe environment for learning and patient care is essential. We recommend that educators set expectations about use of medical jargon and engagement of the patient and family before they enter the patient room with trainees. Keep learners focused by asking relevant questions of all members of the team and by maintaining a collective leadership style. Assess and model clinical reasoning through a hypothesis-driven approach that explores the rationale for clinical decisions. Focused, specific, real-time feedback is essential for the learner to modify behaviors for future patient encounters. Together, these strategies may alleviate challenges associated with bedside teaching and ensure it remains a part of physician practice in academic medicine.

AB - Academic physicians encounter many demands on their time including patient care, quality and performance requirements, research, and education. In an era when patient volume is prioritized and competition for research funding is intense, there is a risk that medical education will become marginalized. Bedside teaching, a responsibility of academic physicians regardless of professional track, is challenged in particular out of concern that it generates inefficiency, and distractions from direct patient care, and can distort physician-patient relationships. At the same time, the bedside is a powerful location for teaching as learners more easily engage with educational content when they can directly see its practical relevance for patient care. Also, bedside teaching enables patients and family members to engage directly in the educational process. Successful bedside teaching can be aided by consideration of four factors: climate, attention, reasoning, and evaluation. Creating a safe environment for learning and patient care is essential. We recommend that educators set expectations about use of medical jargon and engagement of the patient and family before they enter the patient room with trainees. Keep learners focused by asking relevant questions of all members of the team and by maintaining a collective leadership style. Assess and model clinical reasoning through a hypothesis-driven approach that explores the rationale for clinical decisions. Focused, specific, real-time feedback is essential for the learner to modify behaviors for future patient encounters. Together, these strategies may alleviate challenges associated with bedside teaching and ensure it remains a part of physician practice in academic medicine.

KW - Education

KW - Professional

KW - Training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84989282828&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84989282828&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201601-018AS

DO - 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201601-018AS

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 545

EP - 548

JO - Annals of the American Thoracic Society

JF - Annals of the American Thoracic Society

SN - 2325-6621

IS - 4

ER -