Technical nuances for surgery of insular gliomas: Lessons learned

Roberto Rey-Dios, Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Insular gliomas were traditionally considered a nonsurgical entity due to the high morbidity associated with resection. For the past 20 years, advances in microsurgical and brain mapping techniques have allowed neurosurgeons to resect insular gliomas with acceptable morbidity rates. Maximizing the extent of resection is nowadays the goal of surgery since this has proven to be an independent factor contributing to longer survival. Despite much progress, insular tumors remain a challenge for the neurosurgeon due to the complex anatomy of the region and technical expertise required to minimize morbidity during surgery. Herein, the authors describe the current surgical nuances, based on their experience and a literature review, that will allow the surgeon to achieve a thorough resection while ensuring patient safety. The key factors for successful surgery in the insular region include detailed knowledge of the surgical anatomy, mastery of the nuances of cortical and subcortical mapping methods, and meticulous microsurgical technique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberE6
JournalNeurosurgical focus
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013

Fingerprint

Glioma
Morbidity
Anatomy
Brain Mapping
Professional Competence
Patient Safety
Neoplasms
Neurosurgeons
Surgeons

Keywords

  • Awake craniotomy
  • Cortical mapping
  • Insular glioma
  • Microsurgical resection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Technical nuances for surgery of insular gliomas : Lessons learned. / Rey-Dios, Roberto; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

In: Neurosurgical focus, Vol. 34, No. 2, E6, 01.02.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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