Telecare management of pain and depression in patients with cancer: Patient satisfaction and predictors of use

Shelley Johns, Kurt Kroenke, Dale E. Theobald, Jingwei Wu, Wanzhu Tu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pain and depression are 2 of the most common and disabling cancer-related symptoms. In the Indiana Cancer Pain and Depression trial, 202 cancer patients with pain and/or depression were randomized to the intervention group and received centralized telecare management augmented by automated symptom monitoring (ASM). Over the 12-month trial, the average patient completed 2 ASM reports and 1 nurse call per month. Satisfaction with both ASM and care management was high regardless of patient characteristics or cancer type. Adherence was also generally good, although several predictors of fewer ASM reports and nurse calls were identified. Only a minority of ASM reports triggered a nurse call, suggesting the efficiency of coupling clinician-delivered telecare management with automated monitoring.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-139
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Ambulatory Care Management
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

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Pain Management
Patient Satisfaction
Nurses
Depression
Pain
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • automated symptom monitoring
  • cancer
  • depression
  • pain
  • telecare management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Telecare management of pain and depression in patients with cancer : Patient satisfaction and predictors of use. / Johns, Shelley; Kroenke, Kurt; Theobald, Dale E.; Wu, Jingwei; Tu, Wanzhu.

In: Journal of Ambulatory Care Management, Vol. 34, No. 2, 04.2011, p. 126-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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