Telecare management of pain and mood symptoms: Adherence, utility, and patient satisfaction

Michael A. Bushey, Kurt Kroenke, Julia Weiner, Brian Porter, Erica Evans, Fitsum Baye, Spencer Lourens, Sharon Weitlauf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Pain, depression, and anxiety are prominent symptoms that frequently co-occur, causing significant debilitation and frequent primary care visits. This paper examines the acceptability of telecare and self-management modules in managing these conditions in a randomized trial. Methods: The Comprehensive Management of Mood and Physical Symptoms (CAMMPS) trial compared an automated symptom management (ASM) plus self-management intervention with a comprehensive symptom management (CSM) intervention that added telecare facilitation of enhanced services. Data from the CAMMPS trial were analysed to compare the acceptability of these two interventions as indicated by utilization and patient satisfaction surveys. Results: The mean number of automated reports completed was similar between the CSM and ASM groups (14.5 vs 14.0). Responses designated with clinically relevant “red alerts” (i.e. patient reports warranting an expedited nurse contact) were more frequent in the CSM group (10.2 vs 8.3). The CSM and ASM groups completed a similar number of the nine self-management modules (6.3 vs 5.8). The mean helpfulness score across all modules was higher in the CSM group than in the ASM group (1.8 vs 1.5; p =.003). The most common feedback suggestion from the ASM group was to have more personal interaction, while participants from both groups commonly suggested technical improvements or requests for more flexible timing of calls. Discussion: Participants generally found both interventions satisfactory, with a trend in satisfaction data suggesting that patients tended to find the CSM intervention more helpful.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Telemedicine and Telecare
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Pain Management
Self Care
Patient Satisfaction
Primary Health Care
Anxiety
Nurses
Depression
Pain

Keywords

  • acceptability
  • anxiety
  • automated symptom management
  • depression
  • pain
  • Telecare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Telecare management of pain and mood symptoms : Adherence, utility, and patient satisfaction. / Bushey, Michael A.; Kroenke, Kurt; Weiner, Julia; Porter, Brian; Evans, Erica; Baye, Fitsum; Lourens, Spencer; Weitlauf, Sharon.

In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bushey, Michael A. ; Kroenke, Kurt ; Weiner, Julia ; Porter, Brian ; Evans, Erica ; Baye, Fitsum ; Lourens, Spencer ; Weitlauf, Sharon. / Telecare management of pain and mood symptoms : Adherence, utility, and patient satisfaction. In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare. 2019.
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