Telephone assessment of cognitive function in the late-onset Alzheimer's disease family study

Robert S. Wilson, Sue E. Leurgans, Tatiana Foroud, Robert A. Sweet, Neill Graff-Radford, Richard Mayeux, David A. Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Administration of cognitive test batteries by telephone has been shown to be a valid and costeffective means of assessing cognition, but it remains relatively uncommon in epidemiological research. Objectives: To develop composite cognitive measures and assess how much of the variability in their scores is associated with mode of test administration (ie, in person or by telephone). Design: Cross-sectional cohort study. Setting: Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Family Study conducted at 18 centers across the United States. Participants: A total of 1584 persons, 368 with dementia, from 646 families. Main Outcome Measures: Scores on composite measures of memory and cognitive function derived from a battery of 7 performance tests administered in person (69%) or by telephone (31%) by examiners who underwent a structured performance-based training program with annual recertification. Results: Based in part on the results of a factor analysis of the 7 tests, we developed summary measures of working memory, declarative memory, episodic memory, semantic memory, and global cognition. In linear regression analyses, mode of test administration accounted for less than 2% of the variance in the measures. In mixedeffects models, variability in cognitive scores due to center was small relative to variability due to differences between individuals and families. Conclusions: In epidemiologic research on aging and Alzheimer disease, assessment of cognition by telephone has little effect on performance and provides operational flexibility and a means of reducing both costs and missing data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)855-861
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume67
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

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Telephone
Cognition
Alzheimer Disease
Episodic Memory
Short-Term Memory
Research
Semantics
Individuality
Statistical Factor Analysis
Dementia
Linear Models
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Onset
Alzheimer's Disease
Cognitive Function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Wilson, R. S., Leurgans, S. E., Foroud, T., Sweet, R. A., Graff-Radford, N., Mayeux, R., & Bennett, D. A. (2010). Telephone assessment of cognitive function in the late-onset Alzheimer's disease family study. Archives of Neurology, 67(7), 855-861. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneurol.2010.129

Telephone assessment of cognitive function in the late-onset Alzheimer's disease family study. / Wilson, Robert S.; Leurgans, Sue E.; Foroud, Tatiana; Sweet, Robert A.; Graff-Radford, Neill; Mayeux, Richard; Bennett, David A.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 67, No. 7, 07.2010, p. 855-861.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, RS, Leurgans, SE, Foroud, T, Sweet, RA, Graff-Radford, N, Mayeux, R & Bennett, DA 2010, 'Telephone assessment of cognitive function in the late-onset Alzheimer's disease family study', Archives of Neurology, vol. 67, no. 7, pp. 855-861. https://doi.org/10.1001/archneurol.2010.129
Wilson, Robert S. ; Leurgans, Sue E. ; Foroud, Tatiana ; Sweet, Robert A. ; Graff-Radford, Neill ; Mayeux, Richard ; Bennett, David A. / Telephone assessment of cognitive function in the late-onset Alzheimer's disease family study. In: Archives of Neurology. 2010 ; Vol. 67, No. 7. pp. 855-861.
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