Temporal integration of speech prosody is shaped by language experience: An fMRI study

Jack Gandour, Mario Dzemidzic, Donald Wong, Mark Lowe, Yunxia Tong, Li Hsieh, Nakarin Satthamnuwong, Joseph Lurito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

Differences in hemispheric functions underlying speech perception may be related to the size of temporal integration windows over which prosodic features (e.g., pitch) span in the speech signal. Chinese tone and intonation, both signaled by variations in pitch contours, span over shorter (local) and longer (global) temporal domains, respectively. This cross-linguistic (Chinese and English) study uses functional magnetic resonance imaging to show that pitch contours associated with tones are processed in the left hemisphere by Chinese listeners only, whereas pitch contours associated with intonation are processed predominantly in the right hemisphere. These findings argue against the view that all aspects of speech prosody are lateralized to the right hemisphere, and promote the idea that varying-sized temporal integration windows reflect a neurobiological adaptation to meet the 'prosodic needs' of a particular language.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-336
Number of pages19
JournalBrain and Language
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Temporal integration of speech prosody is shaped by language experience: An fMRI study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Gandour, J., Dzemidzic, M., Wong, D., Lowe, M., Tong, Y., Hsieh, L., Satthamnuwong, N., & Lurito, J. (2003). Temporal integration of speech prosody is shaped by language experience: An fMRI study. Brain and Language, 84(3), 318-336. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0093-934X(02)00505-9