Temporal trends in recording of diabetes on death certificates

Results from Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD)

Laura N. McEwen, Andrew J. Karter, J. David Curb, David Marrero, Jesse C. Crosson, William H. Herman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To determine the frequency that diabetes is reported on death certificates of decedents with known diabetes and describe trends in reporting over 8 years. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Data were obtained from 11,927 participants with diabetes who were enrolled in Translating Research into Action for Diabetes, a multicenter prospective observational study of diabetes care in managed care. Data on decedents (N = 2,261) were obtained from the National Death Index from 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2007. The primary dependent variables were the presence of the ICD-10 codes for diabetes listed anywhere on the death certificate or as the underlying cause of death. RESULTS - Diabetes was recorded on 41% of death certificates and as the underlying cause of death for 13% of decedents with diabetes. Diabetes was significantly more likely to be reported on the death certificate of decedents dying of cardiovascular disease than all other causes. There was a statistically significant trend of increased reporting of diabetes as the underlying cause of death over time (P < 0.001), which persisted after controlling for duration of diabetes at death. The increase in reporting of diabetes as the underlying cause of death was associated with a decrease in the reporting of cardiovascular disease as the underlying cause of death (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS - Death certificates continue to underestimate the prevalence of diabetes among decedents. The increase in reporting of diabetes as the underlying cause of death over the past 8 years will likely impact estimates of the burden of diabetes in the U.S.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1529-1533
Number of pages5
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

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Death Certificates
Cause of Death
Research
International Classification of Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Managed Care Programs
Observational Studies
Research Design
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Temporal trends in recording of diabetes on death certificates : Results from Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD). / McEwen, Laura N.; Karter, Andrew J.; Curb, J. David; Marrero, David; Crosson, Jesse C.; Herman, William H.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 34, No. 7, 07.2011, p. 1529-1533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McEwen, Laura N. ; Karter, Andrew J. ; Curb, J. David ; Marrero, David ; Crosson, Jesse C. ; Herman, William H. / Temporal trends in recording of diabetes on death certificates : Results from Translating Research into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD). In: Diabetes Care. 2011 ; Vol. 34, No. 7. pp. 1529-1533.
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