Tetanus toxin attenuates the ability of phorbol myristate acetate to mobilize cytosolic protein kinase C in NG-108 cells

Robert V. Considine, John K. Bielicki, Lance L. Simpson, Joseph R. Sherwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

R. V. Considine, J. K. Bielicki, L. L. Simpson and J. R. Sherwin. Tetanus toxin attenuates the ability of phorbol myristate acetate to mobilize cytosolic protein kinase C in NG-108 cells. Toxicon 28, 13-19, 1990.-Although the pathology of tetanus toxin poisoning has been linked to an inhibition of neurotransmitter release, the mechanism of this inhibition is unknown. The neuroblastoma × glioma hybrid cell NG-108 is an emerging model in which to study the biochemical effect of tetanus toxin on acetylcholine secretion. In differentiated as well as undifferentiated NG-108 cells, a 4 hr tetanus toxin (10-8 M) pretreatment had no effect on basal levels of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. In addition, toxin pretreatment did not affect agonist induced increases in either cyclic nucleotide. Treatment of NG-108 cells for 4 hr with 10-10 M tetanus toxin had no effect on the subsequently measured activity of cytosolic protein kinase C. However, a 4 hr pretreatment of undifferentiated or differentiated cells with tetanus toxin (10-8 or 10-10 M respectively) significantly attenuated the ability of phorbol myristate acetate to mobilize cytosolic protein kinase C. Direct addition of tetanus toxin (10-7-10-10 M) to isolated protein kinase C did not alter the ability of the enzyme to phosphorylate histone protein. These results suggest that one manifestation of tetanus toxin poisoning may be a disruption in protein kinase C metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-19
Number of pages7
JournalToxicon
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

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