The apéritif effect: Alcohol's effects on the brain's response to food aromas in women

William J A Eiler, Mario Dzemidzic, K. Rose Case, Christina M. Soeurt, Cheryl L H Armstrong, Richard D. Mattes, Sean O'Connor, Jaroslaw Harezlak, Anthony J. Acton, Robert Considine, David Kareken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Consuming alcohol prior to a meal (an apéritif) increases food consumption. This greater food consumption may result from increased activity in brain regions that mediate reward and regulate feeding behavior. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we evaluated the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response to the food aromas of either roast beef or Italian meat sauce following pharmacokinetically controlled intravenous infusion of alcohol. Methods BOLD activation to food aromas in non-obese women (n-=-35) was evaluated once during intravenous infusion of 6% v/v EtOH, clamped at a steady-state breath alcohol concentration of 50 mg%, and once during infusion of saline using matching pump rates. Ad libitum intake of roast beef with noodles or Italian meat sauce with pasta following imaging was recorded. Results BOLD activation to food relative to non-food odors in the hypothalamic area was increased during alcohol pre-load when compared to saline. Food consumption was significantly greater, and levels of ghrelin were reduced, following alcohol. Conclusions An alcohol pre-load increased food consumption and potentiated differences between food and non-food BOLD responses in the region of the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus may mediate the interplay of alcohol and responses to food cues, thus playing a role in the apéritif phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1386-1393
Number of pages8
JournalObesity
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Fingerprint

Alcohols
Food
Brain
Intravenous Infusions
Meat
Hypothalamus
Ghrelin
Feeding Behavior
Reward
Cues
Meals
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Eiler, W. J. A., Dzemidzic, M., Case, K. R., Soeurt, C. M., Armstrong, C. L. H., Mattes, R. D., ... Kareken, D. (2015). The apéritif effect: Alcohol's effects on the brain's response to food aromas in women. Obesity, 23(7), 1386-1393. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.21109

The apéritif effect : Alcohol's effects on the brain's response to food aromas in women. / Eiler, William J A; Dzemidzic, Mario; Case, K. Rose; Soeurt, Christina M.; Armstrong, Cheryl L H; Mattes, Richard D.; O'Connor, Sean; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Acton, Anthony J.; Considine, Robert; Kareken, David.

In: Obesity, Vol. 23, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 1386-1393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eiler WJA, Dzemidzic M, Case KR, Soeurt CM, Armstrong CLH, Mattes RD et al. The apéritif effect: Alcohol's effects on the brain's response to food aromas in women. Obesity. 2015 Jul 1;23(7):1386-1393. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.21109
Eiler, William J A ; Dzemidzic, Mario ; Case, K. Rose ; Soeurt, Christina M. ; Armstrong, Cheryl L H ; Mattes, Richard D. ; O'Connor, Sean ; Harezlak, Jaroslaw ; Acton, Anthony J. ; Considine, Robert ; Kareken, David. / The apéritif effect : Alcohol's effects on the brain's response to food aromas in women. In: Obesity. 2015 ; Vol. 23, No. 7. pp. 1386-1393.
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