The association of sleep disturbances with glycemia and obesity in youth at risk for or with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes

on behalf of the RISE Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Poor sleep may increase obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in youth. We explored whether subjective sleep duration, sleep quality, or risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are associated with glycemia, body mass index (BMI), or blood pressure (BP) in overweight/obese youth. Methods: Two-hundred and fourteen overweight/obese youth of 10 to 19 years of age at risk for or recently diagnosed with T2D who were screened for the Restoring Insulin Secretion (RISE) Study had a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and completed a Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness questionnaire and a Sleep Disturbances Scale questionnaire. Independent associations between sleep variables and measures of glycemia, BMI, and BP were evaluated with regression models. Results: The multiethnic cohort was 67% female, 14.1 ± 2.1 years, and BMI 35.9 ± 6.5 kg/m2. Habitual sleep duration <8 hours was reported in 74%. Daytime sleepiness was reported in 51%, poor sleep quality in 26%, and 30% had high obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk. Daytime sleepiness was associated with higher HbA1c (0.2%, P =.02) and 2-hour glucose (13.6 mg/dL, P <.05). Sleep duration, sleep quality, and OSA risk were not associated with the evaluated outcomes. Poor sleep quality and OSA risk were associated with higher BMI (2.9 kg/m2, P =.004 and 2.83 kg/m2, P <.003, respectively). Conclusions: In overweight/obese youth with or at risk for T2D, daytime sleepiness was associated with higher HbA1c. In addition, poor sleep quality and OSA risk were associated with higher BMI. These findings support intervention studies aimed at improving sleep quality in obese youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1056-1063
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Diabetes
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Sleep
Obesity
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Body Mass Index
Blood Pressure
Glucose Tolerance Test
Insulin
Glucose

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • children
  • glucose
  • glycemia
  • hemoglobin A1c
  • hypersomnolence
  • hypertension
  • obesity
  • sleep apnea
  • sleep duration
  • sleep quality
  • sleepiness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

The association of sleep disturbances with glycemia and obesity in youth at risk for or with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes. / on behalf of the RISE Consortium.

In: Pediatric Diabetes, Vol. 20, No. 8, 01.12.2019, p. 1056-1063.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "The association of sleep disturbances with glycemia and obesity in youth at risk for or with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "Objective: Poor sleep may increase obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in youth. We explored whether subjective sleep duration, sleep quality, or risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are associated with glycemia, body mass index (BMI), or blood pressure (BP) in overweight/obese youth. Methods: Two-hundred and fourteen overweight/obese youth of 10 to 19 years of age at risk for or recently diagnosed with T2D who were screened for the Restoring Insulin Secretion (RISE) Study had a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and completed a Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness questionnaire and a Sleep Disturbances Scale questionnaire. Independent associations between sleep variables and measures of glycemia, BMI, and BP were evaluated with regression models. Results: The multiethnic cohort was 67{\%} female, 14.1 ± 2.1 years, and BMI 35.9 ± 6.5 kg/m2. Habitual sleep duration <8 hours was reported in 74{\%}. Daytime sleepiness was reported in 51{\%}, poor sleep quality in 26{\%}, and 30{\%} had high obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk. Daytime sleepiness was associated with higher HbA1c (0.2{\%}, P =.02) and 2-hour glucose (13.6 mg/dL, P <.05). Sleep duration, sleep quality, and OSA risk were not associated with the evaluated outcomes. Poor sleep quality and OSA risk were associated with higher BMI (2.9 kg/m2, P =.004 and 2.83 kg/m2, P <.003, respectively). Conclusions: In overweight/obese youth with or at risk for T2D, daytime sleepiness was associated with higher HbA1c. In addition, poor sleep quality and OSA risk were associated with higher BMI. These findings support intervention studies aimed at improving sleep quality in obese youth.",
keywords = "adolescents, children, glucose, glycemia, hemoglobin A1c, hypersomnolence, hypertension, obesity, sleep apnea, sleep duration, sleep quality, sleepiness",
author = "{on behalf of the RISE Consortium} and Babak Mokhlesi and Temple, {Karla A.} and Tjaden, {Ashley H.} and Edelstein, {Sharon L.} and Nadeau, {Kristen J.} and Hannon, {Tamara S.} and Shalini Manchanda and Susan Sam and Elena Barengolts and Utzschneider, {Kristina M.} and Ehrmann, {David A.} and {Van Cauter}, Eve",
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month = "12",
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T1 - The association of sleep disturbances with glycemia and obesity in youth at risk for or with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes

AU - on behalf of the RISE Consortium

AU - Mokhlesi, Babak

AU - Temple, Karla A.

AU - Tjaden, Ashley H.

AU - Edelstein, Sharon L.

AU - Nadeau, Kristen J.

AU - Hannon, Tamara S.

AU - Manchanda, Shalini

AU - Sam, Susan

AU - Barengolts, Elena

AU - Utzschneider, Kristina M.

AU - Ehrmann, David A.

AU - Van Cauter, Eve

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Objective: Poor sleep may increase obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in youth. We explored whether subjective sleep duration, sleep quality, or risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are associated with glycemia, body mass index (BMI), or blood pressure (BP) in overweight/obese youth. Methods: Two-hundred and fourteen overweight/obese youth of 10 to 19 years of age at risk for or recently diagnosed with T2D who were screened for the Restoring Insulin Secretion (RISE) Study had a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and completed a Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness questionnaire and a Sleep Disturbances Scale questionnaire. Independent associations between sleep variables and measures of glycemia, BMI, and BP were evaluated with regression models. Results: The multiethnic cohort was 67% female, 14.1 ± 2.1 years, and BMI 35.9 ± 6.5 kg/m2. Habitual sleep duration <8 hours was reported in 74%. Daytime sleepiness was reported in 51%, poor sleep quality in 26%, and 30% had high obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk. Daytime sleepiness was associated with higher HbA1c (0.2%, P =.02) and 2-hour glucose (13.6 mg/dL, P <.05). Sleep duration, sleep quality, and OSA risk were not associated with the evaluated outcomes. Poor sleep quality and OSA risk were associated with higher BMI (2.9 kg/m2, P =.004 and 2.83 kg/m2, P <.003, respectively). Conclusions: In overweight/obese youth with or at risk for T2D, daytime sleepiness was associated with higher HbA1c. In addition, poor sleep quality and OSA risk were associated with higher BMI. These findings support intervention studies aimed at improving sleep quality in obese youth.

AB - Objective: Poor sleep may increase obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk in youth. We explored whether subjective sleep duration, sleep quality, or risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are associated with glycemia, body mass index (BMI), or blood pressure (BP) in overweight/obese youth. Methods: Two-hundred and fourteen overweight/obese youth of 10 to 19 years of age at risk for or recently diagnosed with T2D who were screened for the Restoring Insulin Secretion (RISE) Study had a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and completed a Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness questionnaire and a Sleep Disturbances Scale questionnaire. Independent associations between sleep variables and measures of glycemia, BMI, and BP were evaluated with regression models. Results: The multiethnic cohort was 67% female, 14.1 ± 2.1 years, and BMI 35.9 ± 6.5 kg/m2. Habitual sleep duration <8 hours was reported in 74%. Daytime sleepiness was reported in 51%, poor sleep quality in 26%, and 30% had high obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk. Daytime sleepiness was associated with higher HbA1c (0.2%, P =.02) and 2-hour glucose (13.6 mg/dL, P <.05). Sleep duration, sleep quality, and OSA risk were not associated with the evaluated outcomes. Poor sleep quality and OSA risk were associated with higher BMI (2.9 kg/m2, P =.004 and 2.83 kg/m2, P <.003, respectively). Conclusions: In overweight/obese youth with or at risk for T2D, daytime sleepiness was associated with higher HbA1c. In addition, poor sleep quality and OSA risk were associated with higher BMI. These findings support intervention studies aimed at improving sleep quality in obese youth.

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KW - children

KW - glucose

KW - glycemia

KW - hemoglobin A1c

KW - hypersomnolence

KW - hypertension

KW - obesity

KW - sleep apnea

KW - sleep duration

KW - sleep quality

KW - sleepiness

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