The ATP-dependent protease ClpP inhibits biofilm formation by regulating Agr and cell wall hydrolase Sle1 in Staphylococcus aureus

Qian Liu, Xing Wang, Juanxiu Qin, Sen Cheng, Won Sik Yeo, Lei He, Xiaowei Ma, Xiaoyun Liu, Min Li, Taeok Bae

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biofilm causes hospital-associated infections on indwelling medical devices. In Staphylococcus aureus, Biofilm formation is controlled by intricately coordinated network of regulating systems, of which the ATP-dependent protease ClpP shows an inhibitory effect. Here, we demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of ClpP on biofilm formation is through Agr and the cell wall hydrolase Sle1. Biofilm formed by clpP mutant consists of proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA). The increase of the protein was, at least in part, due to the reduced protease activity of the mutant, which was caused by the decreased activity of agr. On the other hand, the increase of eDNA was due to increased cell lysis caused by the higher level of Sle1. Indeed, as compared with wild type, the clpP mutant excreted an increased level of eDNA, and showed higher sensitivity to Triton-induced autolysis. The deletion of sle1 in the clpP mutant decreased the biofilm formation, the level of eDNA, and the Triton-induced autolysis to wild-type levels. Despite the increased biofilm formation capability, however, the clpP mutant showed significantly reduced virulence in a murine model of subcutaneous foreign body infection, indicating that the increased biofilm formation capability cannot compensate for the intrinsic functions of ClpP during infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number181
JournalFrontiers in cellular and infection microbiology
Volume7
Issue numberMAY
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2017

Fingerprint

ATP-Dependent Proteases
Hydrolases
Biofilms
Cell Wall
Staphylococcus aureus
Autolysis
DNA
Mutant Proteins
Cross Infection
Foreign Bodies
Infection
Virulence
Peptide Hydrolases
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Agr
  • Biofilm
  • Cell wall hydrolysis
  • Proteolysis system
  • Staphylococcus aureus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

The ATP-dependent protease ClpP inhibits biofilm formation by regulating Agr and cell wall hydrolase Sle1 in Staphylococcus aureus. / Liu, Qian; Wang, Xing; Qin, Juanxiu; Cheng, Sen; Yeo, Won Sik; He, Lei; Ma, Xiaowei; Liu, Xiaoyun; Li, Min; Bae, Taeok.

In: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology, Vol. 7, No. MAY, 181, 15.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Qian ; Wang, Xing ; Qin, Juanxiu ; Cheng, Sen ; Yeo, Won Sik ; He, Lei ; Ma, Xiaowei ; Liu, Xiaoyun ; Li, Min ; Bae, Taeok. / The ATP-dependent protease ClpP inhibits biofilm formation by regulating Agr and cell wall hydrolase Sle1 in Staphylococcus aureus. In: Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. MAY.
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