The changing hopes, worries, and community supports of individuals moving from a closing long-term care facility

Bernice A. Pescosolido, Eric R. Wright, Karen Lutfey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This study examines client's hopes, worries, and social networks before, one year, and two years following release from a long-term care facility. More clients expressed hopes than worries before closure but, over time, hopes decreased and worries increased significantly. Before closing, independence was cited most often as a hope, followed by work and finances. Criminal opportunities headed up concerns, followed by mental health treatment, finances, living arrangements and independence. Over time, respondents were less excited about independence and living arrangements but more hopeful about social opportunities and everyday practicalities. Worries relating to family increased while concerns about deviance decreased. Respondents reported an average increase in network ties but the proportion of family members decreased while professional supports and ties with former CSH patients increased. The trends highlight particular vulnerability at the one-year point, the necessity of viewing movement into the community as a nonlinear process, and the importance of marking outcomes periodically.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)276-288
    Number of pages13
    JournalJournal of Behavioral Health Services and Research
    Volume26
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 1999

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    Hope
    Long-Term Care
    life situation
    community
    finance
    social opportunity
    deviant behavior
    Social Support
    family member
    Mental Health
    social network
    vulnerability
    mental health
    trend

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Health(social science)
    • Health Professions(all)

    Cite this

    The changing hopes, worries, and community supports of individuals moving from a closing long-term care facility. / Pescosolido, Bernice A.; Wright, Eric R.; Lutfey, Karen.

    In: Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research, Vol. 26, No. 3, 08.1999, p. 276-288.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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