The development and implementation of a curriculum to improve clinicians' self-directed learning skills

A pilot project

Dawn Bravata, Stephen J. Huot, Hadley S. Abernathy, Kelley M. Skeff, Dena M C Bravata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Clinicians need self-directed learning skills to maintain competency. The objective of this study was to develop and implement a curriculum to teach physicians self-directed learning skills during inpatient ward rotations. Methods: Residents and attendings from an internal medicine residency were assigned to intervention or control groups; intervention physicians completed self-directed learning curricular exercises. Results: Among the 43 intervention physicians, 21 (49%) completed pre- and post-curriculum tests; and 10 (23%) completed the one-year test. Immediately after exposure to the curriculum, the proportion of physicians defining short- and long-term learning goals increased [short-term: 1/21 (5%) to 11/21 (52%), p = 0.001; long-term: 2/21 (10%) to 15/21 (71%), p = 0.001]. There were no significant changes post-curriculum in the quantity or quality of clinical question asking. The physicians' mean self-efficacy (on a 100-point scale) improved for their abilities to develop a plan to keep up with the medical literature (59 vs. 72, p = 0.04). The effects of the curriculum on self-reported learning behaviors was maintained from the immediate post-curriculum test to the one-year post curriculum test: [short-term learning goals: 1/21 (5%) pre-, 11/21 (52%) immediately post-, and 5/10 (50%) one-year after the curriculum (p = 0.0075 for the pre- vs one-year comparison); long-term learning goals: 2/21 (10%) pre-, 15/21 (71%) immediately post-, and 7/10 (70%) one-year (p = 0.0013 for the pre- vs one-year comparison). At one-year, half of the participants reported changed learning behaviors. Conclusions: A four-week curriculum may improve self-directed learning skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalBMC Medical Education
Volume3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 22 2003
Externally publishedYes

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pilot project
Curriculum
Learning
curriculum
learning
physician
Physicians
learning behavior
Aptitude
Self Efficacy
Internship and Residency
Internal Medicine
self-efficacy
Inpatients
medicine
Exercise
resident
Control Groups
ability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The development and implementation of a curriculum to improve clinicians' self-directed learning skills : A pilot project. / Bravata, Dawn; Huot, Stephen J.; Abernathy, Hadley S.; Skeff, Kelley M.; Bravata, Dena M C.

In: BMC Medical Education, Vol. 3, 1, 22.10.2003, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bravata, Dawn ; Huot, Stephen J. ; Abernathy, Hadley S. ; Skeff, Kelley M. ; Bravata, Dena M C. / The development and implementation of a curriculum to improve clinicians' self-directed learning skills : A pilot project. In: BMC Medical Education. 2003 ; Vol. 3. pp. 1-8.
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