The differential performance effects of healthcare information technology adoption

Anol Bhattacherjee, Neset Hikmet, Nir Menachemi, Varol O. Kayhan, Robert G. Brooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the relationship between the adoption of healthcare information technology (HIT) and a hospital's operational performance. Combining primary survey data from Florida hospitals and secondary data from two government agencies responsible for hospital certification and licensing, the authors find differential performance effects for different clusters of HIT: administrative, clinical, and strategic. Only clinical HIT investments were found to have a statistically significant positive effect on operational performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-14
Number of pages10
JournalInformation Systems Management
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Information technology
information technology
performance
government agency
certification

Keywords

  • Enterprise systems
  • Healthcare information technology
  • Hospital performance
  • IT adoption
  • IT investments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Information Systems
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

The differential performance effects of healthcare information technology adoption. / Bhattacherjee, Anol; Hikmet, Neset; Menachemi, Nir; Kayhan, Varol O.; Brooks, Robert G.

In: Information Systems Management, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 5-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bhattacherjee, Anol ; Hikmet, Neset ; Menachemi, Nir ; Kayhan, Varol O. ; Brooks, Robert G. / The differential performance effects of healthcare information technology adoption. In: Information Systems Management. 2007 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 5-14.
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