The ear is connected to the brain: Some new directions in the study of children with cochlear implants at Indiana University

Derek M. Houston, Jessica Beer, Tonya Bergeson-Dana, Steven B. Chin, David Pisoni, Richard Miyamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, the DeVault Otologic Research Laboratory at the Indiana University School of Medicine has been on the forefront of research on speech and language outcomes in children with cochlear implants. This paper highlights work over the last decade that has moved beyond collecting speech and language outcome measures to focus more on investigating the underlying cognitive, social, and linguistic skills that predict speech and language outcomes. This recent work reflects our growing appreciation that early auditory deprivation can affect more than hearing and speech perception. The new directions include research on attention to speech, word learning, phonological development, social development, and neurocognitive processes. We have also expanded our subject populations to include infants and children with additional disabilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)446-463
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Audiology
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Cochlear Implants
Ear
Language
Brain
Research
Speech Perception
Disabled Children
Linguistics
Hearing
Medicine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Learning
Direction compound
Population

Keywords

  • Auditory rehabilitation
  • Cochlear implants
  • Diagnostic techniques
  • Pediatric audiology
  • Speech perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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