The effect of chronic illness on the psychological health of family members

Ann Holmes, Partha Deb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Chronic illness in a family member can cause emotional distress throughout the family, and may impair the family's ability to support the patient. Objectives: We compare the familial impact of mental illness to other common chronic conditions. We examine the impact of a person's chronic illness on the psychological health of all persons in his or her family and identify both individual and family-level risk factors associated with psychological spillovers. Methods: Our analysis is based on data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) that, because of its sample design, can be used to model both individual and family health status. Psychological distress is measured using responses to the general mental health question for each family member. The chronic conditions considered include cancer, diabetes, stroke-related disorders, arthritis, asthma, and mental illness (including dementia). We estimate the relationships of interest using a semi-parametric method, the discrete random effects probit model. Results: Brain-related conditions, including mental illness, impose the most significant risk to the psychological well-being of family members. The effects of the other chronic conditions studied, while not as significant, are notable in that their negative impacts on the psychological health of family members are sometimes larger than their direct psychological impacts on the patient. Economic distress not only directly increases the chance that an individual will experience emotional distress, but it appears it also reduces the family's ability as a whole to cope psychologically with chronic illness. Discussion: Our analysis suffers from problems common to all cross-sectional designs, although the impact of selection bias appeared to be small in sensitivity analysis. While health conditions were based on unverified self-reports, condition categories were broadly defined to reduce the required precision of such reports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-22
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Mental Health Policy and Economics
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

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Chronic Disease
Psychology
Health
Aptitude
Family Health
Selection Bias
Health Expenditures
Self Report
Health Status
Arthritis
Dementia
Mental Health
Asthma
Stroke
Economics
Brain
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The effect of chronic illness on the psychological health of family members. / Holmes, Ann; Deb, Partha.

In: Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.03.2003, p. 13-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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