The effect of colonoscopy preparation quality on adenoma detection rates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Colonoscopy reduces the risk of colorectal cancer mortality by removing precancerous adenomas. The detection rate of subcentimeter (<10 mm) polyps is lower for procedures with inadequate preparation quality. Objective: To compare the adenoma detection rates of small (6-9 mm) and diminutive (≤5 mm) adenomas in patients with poor and fair quality preparations with those with adequate quality preparations. Design: Cross-sectional study and multivariable, hierarchical model. Setting: Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Patients: This study involved 8800 colonoscopies performed from 2001 to 2010. Main Outcome Measurements: Preparation quality rating, polyp size, and polyp histology. Results: Preparation quality was rated as fair in 2809 (31.9%) and poor in 829 (9.4%) colonoscopies. In patients with poor compared with adequate quality, the detection rate was lower for diminutive adenomas (odds ratio [OR] 0.57; 95% CI, 0.47-0.70) but not for small adenomas (OR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.65-1.07). There were no differences in the detection rate of diminutive (OR 1.08; 95% CI, 0.94-1.24]) or small (OR 1.09; 95% CI, 0.94-1.27) adenomas in patients with fair compared with adequate quality preparation. Detection of advanced histology in patients with poor preparation quality was lower than in those with adequate quality (P =.027; 3.3% vs 5.0%), but there was no difference in those with fair compared with adequate quality (P =.893; 4.9% vs 5.0%). Limitations: Single-center study; no standardization of preparation quality or size measurements. Conclusions: A fair preparation quality rating does not decrease the detection rate for adenomas of any size or for advanced histology, suggesting that fair quality may be considered adequate and that follow-up intervals may not need to be shortened. Poor preparation quality decreases the detection rate of diminutive adenomas and advanced histology, suggesting substandard colonoscopy performance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)545-553
Number of pages9
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume75
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

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Colonoscopy
Adenoma
Histology
Polyps
Odds Ratio
Veterans
Colorectal Neoplasms
Cross-Sectional Studies
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

The effect of colonoscopy preparation quality on adenoma detection rates. / Sherer, Eric A.; Imler, Timothy; Imperiale, Thomas.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 75, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 545-553.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Colonoscopy reduces the risk of colorectal cancer mortality by removing precancerous adenomas. The detection rate of subcentimeter (<10 mm) polyps is lower for procedures with inadequate preparation quality. Objective: To compare the adenoma detection rates of small (6-9 mm) and diminutive (≤5 mm) adenomas in patients with poor and fair quality preparations with those with adequate quality preparations. Design: Cross-sectional study and multivariable, hierarchical model. Setting: Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Patients: This study involved 8800 colonoscopies performed from 2001 to 2010. Main Outcome Measurements: Preparation quality rating, polyp size, and polyp histology. Results: Preparation quality was rated as fair in 2809 (31.9{\%}) and poor in 829 (9.4{\%}) colonoscopies. In patients with poor compared with adequate quality, the detection rate was lower for diminutive adenomas (odds ratio [OR] 0.57; 95{\%} CI, 0.47-0.70) but not for small adenomas (OR 0.84; 95{\%} CI, 0.65-1.07). There were no differences in the detection rate of diminutive (OR 1.08; 95{\%} CI, 0.94-1.24]) or small (OR 1.09; 95{\%} CI, 0.94-1.27) adenomas in patients with fair compared with adequate quality preparation. Detection of advanced histology in patients with poor preparation quality was lower than in those with adequate quality (P =.027; 3.3{\%} vs 5.0{\%}), but there was no difference in those with fair compared with adequate quality (P =.893; 4.9{\%} vs 5.0{\%}). Limitations: Single-center study; no standardization of preparation quality or size measurements. Conclusions: A fair preparation quality rating does not decrease the detection rate for adenomas of any size or for advanced histology, suggesting that fair quality may be considered adequate and that follow-up intervals may not need to be shortened. Poor preparation quality decreases the detection rate of diminutive adenomas and advanced histology, suggesting substandard colonoscopy performance.",
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AB - Background: Colonoscopy reduces the risk of colorectal cancer mortality by removing precancerous adenomas. The detection rate of subcentimeter (<10 mm) polyps is lower for procedures with inadequate preparation quality. Objective: To compare the adenoma detection rates of small (6-9 mm) and diminutive (≤5 mm) adenomas in patients with poor and fair quality preparations with those with adequate quality preparations. Design: Cross-sectional study and multivariable, hierarchical model. Setting: Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Patients: This study involved 8800 colonoscopies performed from 2001 to 2010. Main Outcome Measurements: Preparation quality rating, polyp size, and polyp histology. Results: Preparation quality was rated as fair in 2809 (31.9%) and poor in 829 (9.4%) colonoscopies. In patients with poor compared with adequate quality, the detection rate was lower for diminutive adenomas (odds ratio [OR] 0.57; 95% CI, 0.47-0.70) but not for small adenomas (OR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.65-1.07). There were no differences in the detection rate of diminutive (OR 1.08; 95% CI, 0.94-1.24]) or small (OR 1.09; 95% CI, 0.94-1.27) adenomas in patients with fair compared with adequate quality preparation. Detection of advanced histology in patients with poor preparation quality was lower than in those with adequate quality (P =.027; 3.3% vs 5.0%), but there was no difference in those with fair compared with adequate quality (P =.893; 4.9% vs 5.0%). Limitations: Single-center study; no standardization of preparation quality or size measurements. Conclusions: A fair preparation quality rating does not decrease the detection rate for adenomas of any size or for advanced histology, suggesting that fair quality may be considered adequate and that follow-up intervals may not need to be shortened. Poor preparation quality decreases the detection rate of diminutive adenomas and advanced histology, suggesting substandard colonoscopy performance.

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