The effect of dentifrice quantity and toothbrushing behaviour on oral delivery and retention of fluoride in vivo.

Jonathan Creeth, Domenick Zero, Melissa Mau, Mary Lynn Bosma, Andrew Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While toothpaste F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen have well-characterised impacts on fluoride's effectiveness, other aspects of brushing regimen have much less well-established effects, in particular, dentifrice quantity and brushing duration. An in vivo study (n = 42) of oral fluoride delivery (i.e. oral disposition post-brushing), and retention (i.e. concentration of F(-) in saliva post-brushing, a known efficacy predictor), was performed to compare effects observed with those of dentifrice F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen. Subjects brushed with a NaF-silica dentifrice (Aquafresh Advanced, 1,150 ppm F(-) ) or a control dentifrice (250 ppm F(-) , same base), for 45, 60, 120 or 180 seconds with 0.5 or 1.5 g dentifrice, and rinsed with 15 ml water once or three times in a cross-over design. The F(-) concentration was measured in post-brushing expectorate, rinse and toothbrush washing samples, and in saliva between 5-120 minutes after brushing. Using 1.5 g versus 0.5 g dentifrice increased F(-) in all samples: oral retention of F(-) was almost doubled by this increase. Increasing duration of brushing had more complex effects. The amount of F(-) in the expectorate increased but decreased in both rinse and toothbrush washing samples. Oral F(-) retention increased, but only in the period 30-120 minutes after brushing. Over the ranges investigated, the order of importance on oral F(-) retention was: dentifrice F(-) concentration > quantity > rinsing regimen > brushing duration. Hence, increasing dentifrice quantity and, to a lesser extent, the duration of brushing, can elevate oral fluoride post-brushing. Evidence is accumulating that the importance of these variables to fluoride efficacy may have been underestimated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-24
Number of pages11
JournalInternational dental journal
Volume63 Suppl 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Dentifrices
Toothbrushing
Fluorides
Saliva
Toothpastes
Silicon Dioxide
Cross-Over Studies
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

The effect of dentifrice quantity and toothbrushing behaviour on oral delivery and retention of fluoride in vivo. / Creeth, Jonathan; Zero, Domenick; Mau, Melissa; Bosma, Mary Lynn; Butler, Andrew.

In: International dental journal, Vol. 63 Suppl 2, 12.2013, p. 14-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Creeth, Jonathan ; Zero, Domenick ; Mau, Melissa ; Bosma, Mary Lynn ; Butler, Andrew. / The effect of dentifrice quantity and toothbrushing behaviour on oral delivery and retention of fluoride in vivo. In: International dental journal. 2013 ; Vol. 63 Suppl 2. pp. 14-24.
@article{5647f11bbc9f478596d474a94b31526c,
title = "The effect of dentifrice quantity and toothbrushing behaviour on oral delivery and retention of fluoride in vivo.",
abstract = "While toothpaste F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen have well-characterised impacts on fluoride's effectiveness, other aspects of brushing regimen have much less well-established effects, in particular, dentifrice quantity and brushing duration. An in vivo study (n = 42) of oral fluoride delivery (i.e. oral disposition post-brushing), and retention (i.e. concentration of F(-) in saliva post-brushing, a known efficacy predictor), was performed to compare effects observed with those of dentifrice F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen. Subjects brushed with a NaF-silica dentifrice (Aquafresh Advanced, 1,150 ppm F(-) ) or a control dentifrice (250 ppm F(-) , same base), for 45, 60, 120 or 180 seconds with 0.5 or 1.5 g dentifrice, and rinsed with 15 ml water once or three times in a cross-over design. The F(-) concentration was measured in post-brushing expectorate, rinse and toothbrush washing samples, and in saliva between 5-120 minutes after brushing. Using 1.5 g versus 0.5 g dentifrice increased F(-) in all samples: oral retention of F(-) was almost doubled by this increase. Increasing duration of brushing had more complex effects. The amount of F(-) in the expectorate increased but decreased in both rinse and toothbrush washing samples. Oral F(-) retention increased, but only in the period 30-120 minutes after brushing. Over the ranges investigated, the order of importance on oral F(-) retention was: dentifrice F(-) concentration > quantity > rinsing regimen > brushing duration. Hence, increasing dentifrice quantity and, to a lesser extent, the duration of brushing, can elevate oral fluoride post-brushing. Evidence is accumulating that the importance of these variables to fluoride efficacy may have been underestimated.",
author = "Jonathan Creeth and Domenick Zero and Melissa Mau and Bosma, {Mary Lynn} and Andrew Butler",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1111/idj.12075",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63 Suppl 2",
pages = "14--24",
journal = "International Dental Journal",
issn = "0020-6539",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of dentifrice quantity and toothbrushing behaviour on oral delivery and retention of fluoride in vivo.

AU - Creeth, Jonathan

AU - Zero, Domenick

AU - Mau, Melissa

AU - Bosma, Mary Lynn

AU - Butler, Andrew

PY - 2013/12

Y1 - 2013/12

N2 - While toothpaste F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen have well-characterised impacts on fluoride's effectiveness, other aspects of brushing regimen have much less well-established effects, in particular, dentifrice quantity and brushing duration. An in vivo study (n = 42) of oral fluoride delivery (i.e. oral disposition post-brushing), and retention (i.e. concentration of F(-) in saliva post-brushing, a known efficacy predictor), was performed to compare effects observed with those of dentifrice F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen. Subjects brushed with a NaF-silica dentifrice (Aquafresh Advanced, 1,150 ppm F(-) ) or a control dentifrice (250 ppm F(-) , same base), for 45, 60, 120 or 180 seconds with 0.5 or 1.5 g dentifrice, and rinsed with 15 ml water once or three times in a cross-over design. The F(-) concentration was measured in post-brushing expectorate, rinse and toothbrush washing samples, and in saliva between 5-120 minutes after brushing. Using 1.5 g versus 0.5 g dentifrice increased F(-) in all samples: oral retention of F(-) was almost doubled by this increase. Increasing duration of brushing had more complex effects. The amount of F(-) in the expectorate increased but decreased in both rinse and toothbrush washing samples. Oral F(-) retention increased, but only in the period 30-120 minutes after brushing. Over the ranges investigated, the order of importance on oral F(-) retention was: dentifrice F(-) concentration > quantity > rinsing regimen > brushing duration. Hence, increasing dentifrice quantity and, to a lesser extent, the duration of brushing, can elevate oral fluoride post-brushing. Evidence is accumulating that the importance of these variables to fluoride efficacy may have been underestimated.

AB - While toothpaste F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen have well-characterised impacts on fluoride's effectiveness, other aspects of brushing regimen have much less well-established effects, in particular, dentifrice quantity and brushing duration. An in vivo study (n = 42) of oral fluoride delivery (i.e. oral disposition post-brushing), and retention (i.e. concentration of F(-) in saliva post-brushing, a known efficacy predictor), was performed to compare effects observed with those of dentifrice F(-) concentration and rinsing regimen. Subjects brushed with a NaF-silica dentifrice (Aquafresh Advanced, 1,150 ppm F(-) ) or a control dentifrice (250 ppm F(-) , same base), for 45, 60, 120 or 180 seconds with 0.5 or 1.5 g dentifrice, and rinsed with 15 ml water once or three times in a cross-over design. The F(-) concentration was measured in post-brushing expectorate, rinse and toothbrush washing samples, and in saliva between 5-120 minutes after brushing. Using 1.5 g versus 0.5 g dentifrice increased F(-) in all samples: oral retention of F(-) was almost doubled by this increase. Increasing duration of brushing had more complex effects. The amount of F(-) in the expectorate increased but decreased in both rinse and toothbrush washing samples. Oral F(-) retention increased, but only in the period 30-120 minutes after brushing. Over the ranges investigated, the order of importance on oral F(-) retention was: dentifrice F(-) concentration > quantity > rinsing regimen > brushing duration. Hence, increasing dentifrice quantity and, to a lesser extent, the duration of brushing, can elevate oral fluoride post-brushing. Evidence is accumulating that the importance of these variables to fluoride efficacy may have been underestimated.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84894454211&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84894454211&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/idj.12075

DO - 10.1111/idj.12075

M3 - Article

C2 - 24283280

AN - SCOPUS:84894454211

VL - 63 Suppl 2

SP - 14

EP - 24

JO - International Dental Journal

JF - International Dental Journal

SN - 0020-6539

ER -