The effect of sleep on conscious sedation: A follow-up study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the effect of preoperative sleep on the success of conscious sedation. Seventy-six children, from 18 to 61 months of age, participated in this study. Sixty-two children received chloral hydrate (50-60 mg/kg) and hydroxyzine (15-35 mg) and 14 children received intramuscular meperidine hydrochloride (2.2 mg/kg). Parents were asked to complete a questionnaire which asked several questions about their child's activity the previous day, and their bedtime. The operator ranked the sedations on a scale of 1 to 4, with 1 being good and 4 being poor. The results were statistically evaluated using the Wilcoxon Rank sum test. The children that received a normal amount or greater amount of sleep preoperatively did not show any significantly higher degree of success (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-134
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
Volume21
Issue number2
StatePublished - Dec 1997

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Conscious Sedation
Sleep
Nonparametric Statistics
Hydroxyzine
Chloral Hydrate
Meperidine
Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

The effect of sleep on conscious sedation : A follow-up study. / Sanders, Brian.

In: Journal of Clinical Pediatric Dentistry, Vol. 21, No. 2, 12.1997, p. 131-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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