The effect of walking on lower body disability among older Blacks and Whites

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. This study investigated the association between regular physical activity and risk of or increase in lower body disability in older, community-dwelling Blacks and Whites. Method. The present study used the 1984 to 1990 Longitudinal Study on Aging, which included 413 Black and 3428 White self-respondents 70 years of age or older. Discrete-time hazard models provided estimates of the effects of self-reported walking frequency and regular exercise on lower body disability among Black and White self- respondents. Results. Whites who reported walking 4 to 7 days per week at baseline vs those who reported never walking 1 mile (1.6 km) or more experienced a one-third lower risk of increased disability. Blacks who reported walking 4 to 7 days per week experienced a two-thirds lower risk. Walking 4 to 7 days per week reduced the risk of disability onset by 50% to 80% on all five disability items within the Black sample and by 50% on two items within the White sample. Conclusions. Among older Blacks, walking 4 to 7 days per week had a greater protective effect against lower body decline than any of the other factors, including age and chronic conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-61
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume86
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Walking
Exercise
Independent Living
Age Factors
Proportional Hazards Models
Longitudinal Studies
hydroquinone
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The effect of walking on lower body disability among older Blacks and Whites. / Clark, Daniel.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 86, No. 1, 1996, p. 57-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{773ff78ad0e64e51a225c76577a944f7,
title = "The effect of walking on lower body disability among older Blacks and Whites",
abstract = "Objectives. This study investigated the association between regular physical activity and risk of or increase in lower body disability in older, community-dwelling Blacks and Whites. Method. The present study used the 1984 to 1990 Longitudinal Study on Aging, which included 413 Black and 3428 White self-respondents 70 years of age or older. Discrete-time hazard models provided estimates of the effects of self-reported walking frequency and regular exercise on lower body disability among Black and White self- respondents. Results. Whites who reported walking 4 to 7 days per week at baseline vs those who reported never walking 1 mile (1.6 km) or more experienced a one-third lower risk of increased disability. Blacks who reported walking 4 to 7 days per week experienced a two-thirds lower risk. Walking 4 to 7 days per week reduced the risk of disability onset by 50{\%} to 80{\%} on all five disability items within the Black sample and by 50{\%} on two items within the White sample. Conclusions. Among older Blacks, walking 4 to 7 days per week had a greater protective effect against lower body decline than any of the other factors, including age and chronic conditions.",
author = "Daniel Clark",
year = "1996",
language = "English",
volume = "86",
pages = "57--61",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of walking on lower body disability among older Blacks and Whites

AU - Clark, Daniel

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - Objectives. This study investigated the association between regular physical activity and risk of or increase in lower body disability in older, community-dwelling Blacks and Whites. Method. The present study used the 1984 to 1990 Longitudinal Study on Aging, which included 413 Black and 3428 White self-respondents 70 years of age or older. Discrete-time hazard models provided estimates of the effects of self-reported walking frequency and regular exercise on lower body disability among Black and White self- respondents. Results. Whites who reported walking 4 to 7 days per week at baseline vs those who reported never walking 1 mile (1.6 km) or more experienced a one-third lower risk of increased disability. Blacks who reported walking 4 to 7 days per week experienced a two-thirds lower risk. Walking 4 to 7 days per week reduced the risk of disability onset by 50% to 80% on all five disability items within the Black sample and by 50% on two items within the White sample. Conclusions. Among older Blacks, walking 4 to 7 days per week had a greater protective effect against lower body decline than any of the other factors, including age and chronic conditions.

AB - Objectives. This study investigated the association between regular physical activity and risk of or increase in lower body disability in older, community-dwelling Blacks and Whites. Method. The present study used the 1984 to 1990 Longitudinal Study on Aging, which included 413 Black and 3428 White self-respondents 70 years of age or older. Discrete-time hazard models provided estimates of the effects of self-reported walking frequency and regular exercise on lower body disability among Black and White self- respondents. Results. Whites who reported walking 4 to 7 days per week at baseline vs those who reported never walking 1 mile (1.6 km) or more experienced a one-third lower risk of increased disability. Blacks who reported walking 4 to 7 days per week experienced a two-thirds lower risk. Walking 4 to 7 days per week reduced the risk of disability onset by 50% to 80% on all five disability items within the Black sample and by 50% on two items within the White sample. Conclusions. Among older Blacks, walking 4 to 7 days per week had a greater protective effect against lower body decline than any of the other factors, including age and chronic conditions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030061533&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030061533&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8561243

AN - SCOPUS:0030061533

VL - 86

SP - 57

EP - 61

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 1

ER -