The effects of domain general and health knowledge in processing general and health texts among older adults with hypertension

Jessie Chin, Elizabeth A L Stine-Morrow, Dan Morrow, Xuefei Gao, Thembi Conner-Garcia, James F. Graumlich, Michael Murray

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While there is much evidence that health knowledge supports understanding of health texts, little is known about the processing mechanisms underlying this effect. We used the moving window paradigm to examine attentional allocation to reading health and domain-general texts among older adults with hypertension who varied in verbal ability (general knowledge) and health knowledge. More knowledgeable readers allocated less time to word-level processing and more to conceptual integration. Domain knowledge further engendered earlier conceptual integration in the health texts, as measured by differential allocation to intrasentence integration but less at the end of the sentence compared to less knowledgeable readers. This suggests that knowledge gave readers a head start in building a textbase representation of the ideas conveyed by the sentence. Thus, knowledge helped structure comprehension by supporting conceptual integration. Implications for the design of patients' education materials are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages147-151
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011 - Las Vegas, NV, United States
Duration: Sep 19 2011Sep 23 2011

Other

Other55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011
CountryUnited States
CityLas Vegas, NV
Period9/19/119/23/11

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hypertension
Health
Processing
health
comprehension
Education
paradigm
ability
knowledge
evidence
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Chin, J., Stine-Morrow, E. A. L., Morrow, D., Gao, X., Conner-Garcia, T., Graumlich, J. F., & Murray, M. (2011). The effects of domain general and health knowledge in processing general and health texts among older adults with hypertension. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 147-151) https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181311551029

The effects of domain general and health knowledge in processing general and health texts among older adults with hypertension. / Chin, Jessie; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L; Morrow, Dan; Gao, Xuefei; Conner-Garcia, Thembi; Graumlich, James F.; Murray, Michael.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2011. p. 147-151.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chin, J, Stine-Morrow, EAL, Morrow, D, Gao, X, Conner-Garcia, T, Graumlich, JF & Murray, M 2011, The effects of domain general and health knowledge in processing general and health texts among older adults with hypertension. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. pp. 147-151, 55th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2011, Las Vegas, NV, United States, 9/19/11. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181311551029
Chin J, Stine-Morrow EAL, Morrow D, Gao X, Conner-Garcia T, Graumlich JF et al. The effects of domain general and health knowledge in processing general and health texts among older adults with hypertension. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2011. p. 147-151 https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181311551029
Chin, Jessie ; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L ; Morrow, Dan ; Gao, Xuefei ; Conner-Garcia, Thembi ; Graumlich, James F. ; Murray, Michael. / The effects of domain general and health knowledge in processing general and health texts among older adults with hypertension. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2011. pp. 147-151
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