The effects of health and environment on exercise-class participation in older, urban women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research investigated the effects of health and environmental factors on the dropout and intermittent nonattendance of an exercise program designed specifically for older, female, primary-care patients living in the inner city. Class-attendance records (n = 21,538) from a cohort 110 women were analyzed. Women who dropped out early had poorer perceived health and were more likely to report pain as an exercise barrier at baseline. Those who lived in a census tract where a larger percentage of workers walk to work were less likely to drop out early. Intermittent nonattendance was associated with adverse weather conditions including heat index above 90 °F, wind-chill index below 20 °F, overcast sky, and snow. Better attendance was associated with greater atmospheric pressure, as well as lower number of sunlight hours per day. This research highlights the need to better understand environmental barriers when promoting physical activities in older women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)480-496
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume12
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

Exercise
Health
Snow
Chills
Atmospheric Pressure
Environmental Health
Sunlight
Weather
Censuses
Research
Primary Health Care
Hot Temperature
Pain

Keywords

  • Dropout
  • Exercise adherence
  • Weather

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

The effects of health and environment on exercise-class participation in older, urban women. / Tu, Wanzhu; Stump, Timothy E.; Damush, Teresa; Clark, Daniel.

In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, Vol. 12, No. 4, 10.2004, p. 480-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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